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    For all the fanfare that monochromatic makeup has been garnering this red-carpet season (here’s looking at you, Beyoncé), I admit I’ve had reservations about trying a nude lip. As Vogue’s beauty writer, there’s no shortage of neutral lipsticks on my desk, all lined up in a spectrum of cool flesh tones. Each time a certain shade seduces, I bring it home—only to find a few swipes later that my pale complexion has dissolved into 50 shades of greige. Factor in pallor-inducing winter weather (and maybe the violet under-eye rings of a short night’s sleep), and you get the picture. My bathroom drawer of barely used lipsticks is an all-nude revue. Which is why, on a particularly chilly Monday evening, I call up the makeup artist Romy Soleimani for a quick pre–Fashion Week tutorial. She arrives at the office fresh off a day of backstage tests, with one goal in mind: to lead me into neutral territory. Too often, she explains as she’s unpacking her kit, people get stuck on the “pale, pale, pale” version of the look—usually paired with the requisite smoky eye. “The pitfalls are definitely a color that’s too draining”—which looks all the chalkier this time of year—and also the wrong texture. “Make sure it’s not too dry and not too glossy.” Neutral tones are notoriously unforgiving, so Soleimani’s first step is a gentle lip exfoliation with a dab of Bliss’s sugar scrub on a cotton swab. “Between the dry heat inside and the cold outside and getting off a plane, sometimes the girls are so dehydrated,” she says of keeping the exfoliator in regular rotation for her model clients backstage and on set. I can identify, even if Vogue’s skyscraping World Trade Tower offices are more along the lines of my cruising altitude these days. Next comes hydration (she likes Eve Lom’s Kiss Mix and the honey-laced balm by Nuxe), which sets the stage for our first hit of color: a tawny lip pencil with rosy overtones that she draws onto the entire mouth. “It’s Kevyn Aucoin in Medium—a great universal nude. I could safely recommend this to any woman,” she says. It’s pretty enough on its own, giving off a hint of terracotta, but she takes it down a notch, patting on a whisper of concealer, followed by a dab of By Terry balm in Toffee Cream for extra warmth. “Dusty nude,” she christens the shade. “This one is healthy and friendly and wearable.” For nude lip number two, she reaches for something less expected: a contour cream with coffee undertones. “I definitely like using my fingers, so it doesn’t look overly lipstick-y,” she says, patting the product onto my mouth. The color—a subtle, striking taupe—is fodder for double takes, in an intriguing way. “That’s definitely stronger and more daring. It’s a confident nude lip,” she says. An oxymoron this is not. According to Soleimani, the real key to pulling off a nude lip, however, lies in pairing a pale color with otherwise “dewy, gorgeous skin.” To finish off the look, she adds concealer under the eyes to even out discolorations where necessary, then returns to the Aucoin pencil, using her fingertips to blend the color onto the apples of my cheeks. (On darker skin tones, she might try a contour cream with red undertones, for a hint of flush.) “You really want the skin to look awake,” she explains from behind a cloud of Caudalie’s Beauty Elixir, which she mists over my face before dabbing Weleda Skin Food onto the cheekbones and inner corners of the eyes for hits of illumination. “It’s kind of austere and beautiful,” she says, likening the uniformly tawny palette to wearing layers of monochromatic cashmere by The Row. “You never look overdone; you never look like you’re trying too hard.” Sounds like just the prescription for the mad dash of runway shows ahead. The final proof? I follow up this rare (for me) nude lip with another rare (for me) action in the form of a selfie—and I am here to report that it stands up to even the toughest of Instagram filters. Happy Fashion Week.

    The post How One Very Pale Vogue Editor Mastered the Nude Lip, Took a Selfie, and Lived to Tell the Story appeared first on Vogue.


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    For Honor’s fall 2015 show, hairstylist James Pecis took inspiration from the original seventies French bombshell.

    The post The Beauty Accessory of the Day: Honor’s Metallic Leather Headbands for the Runway appeared first on Vogue.


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    The chop, the crop, the ubiquitous lob, and countless other permutations of the bob have been popping up on red carpets, street style blogs, and even the cover of this month’s Vogue, as seen on cover subjects Karlie Kloss and Taylor Swift. But backstage at Jason Wu this morning, it was the sight of model Rianne Van Rompaey’s waist-length strawberry-blonde cascade that sparked serious hair envy—and left us wondering: Has the moment for Rapunzel-esque lengths finally returned? The first rumblings of the trend began last season, when designer Riccardo Tisci cast model Vanessa Moody—and her mane of long dark hair—to close his Givenchy spring 2015 show; days later, fresh-faced newcomer Jean Campbell opened for Louis Vuitton, her flaxen strands streaming behind her as she strode down the runway. Which brings us back to today at Jason Wu, where the freckle-faced van Rompaey, who hails from Holland, was turning heads backstage in a crisp white T-shirt and high-waisted pants. As backstage hairstylist Odile Gilbert pointed out, it was the first time Wu has ever opted for a hair-down runway look. One glance at the rumpled, naturalistic beauty of Van Rompaey’s pristine copper-tinged mane—which relied on a few blasts of Kérastase V.I.P. Dry Volumizing and Texturizing Spray for the requisite woke-up-like-this ease—and it was obvious why. “It’s sexy, but in a subtle way,” said Gilbert of the effect, which looked just as good spilling over the model’s overscale fur collar when she opened the show. Expect to see much more of the trend in the weeks to come.

    The post Who’s That Girl? Model Rianne Van Rompaey—and Her Hair!—Stole Our Hearts at Jason Wu appeared first on Vogue.


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    The lesson from New York Fashion Week this chilly Friday the thirteenth was written clearly in black—kajal and liquid eyeliner, that is. The takeaway: All you need to kick your daytime makeup into after-party gear is an easy, high-impact eye coming to you straight from the fall runways. Backstage at Cushnie et Ochs, makeup artist Yadim rimmed models’ eyes in Maybelline’s Master Kajal, blending it out into a smoky haze, and then underscored the impact with gel liner extended out in open-ended tracks at the outer corners of the eyes. “You get the sixties Space Age reference but in a modern way,” he explained of the futuristic look, as he swept a veil of emerald shadow followed by Baby Lips balm on the lids for a “wet and shiny” effect. “There’s a bit of moodiness to it. The girls look really intense,” he said; the description applied just as well to the fiercely feminine clothes, from sheer-paneled dresses to a few daringly high slits. Hours later at Suno, makeup artist Alice Lane kept matters even simpler: Wielding the new Maybelline Master Graphic liner—with an angled, wide tip you’d expect to find at an arts-supply store—she gave each model an emphatic dash on either side, in place of the traditional wing. The graphic line played well with the Matisse-inspired florals and Rastafarian stripes in the collection. “It’s literally like a Sharpie!” Lane said of the liner, noting that any corrections can be speedily made with the supertiny swabs sold at Muji. The simplicity of the look packs a punch, she emphasized. “It’s makeup as the accessory.” Consider it the ultimate one-liner.​

    The post Why the Only Thing You Need in Your Makeup Bag This Weekend Is a Simple Black Eyeliner appeared first on Vogue.


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    The backstage fare during Fashion Week is usually a rather virtuous mix of crudités, Juice Press, and granola; after all, models—like seasoned marathoners—need the right kind of fuel to keep up with the grueling pace of back-to-back runway shows. But once a year when Cupid is the caterer, the menu invariably leans toward chocolate kisses and Sweethearts. In honor of Valentine’s Day, we checked in with six models backstage on their favorite indulgences and, because there are sample sizes to contend with, the best fitness strategies for keeping it all in check.   Amanda Murphy   The Indulgence: Valentine’s Day is my fiancé’s birthday, and because of shows I have to miss it every year. But we always celebrate before I leave town, and he got me chocolate-covered strawberries from Shari’s Berries; it’s a place in Chicago. They were white chocolate, dark chocolate, all different kinds—really good. The Workout: I try to work out at least four days a week. [My fiancé] is a naturopath and personal trainer, so he gives me my regimens and then I work out in the hotel gym. I do some weights, some resistance bands, some cardio machines. It’s really a mix. Another thing I love that I can take absolutely anywhere with me because it doesn’t take up any room in my bag is a jump rope. It’s a really good cardio workout, and it strengthens your legs and gives you some endurance. I’m very lucky, yeah—but he doesn’t let me slack!   Ondria Hardin   The Indulgence: Milk chocolate with almonds. I really like chocolate with nuts in it. The Workout: It’s hard for me to work out in a gym—it’s so repetitive—so boxing’s fun to get into shape. I have a trainer; his name’s Tyler Peterson, of Ripped and Company. I go whenever I’m free, or about once a week. You might go in feeling really tired, and you come out with a burst of energy. It’s the adrenaline rush. It makes you feel like you’ve accomplished something.   Hanne Gaby Odiele   The Indulgence: Doughnuts! Coconut cream—anything with coconut. I love the Doughnut Plant ones. The Workout: I’m pretty active. I walk everywhere; sometimes I go for a run, although I haven’t gone in two months now [because it’s so cold]. I also like a morning yoga meditation.   Binx Walton   The Indulgence: I love Lindt chocolate bars—the cookies-and-cream flavor, and the milk chocolate balls are good too. The Workout: Well, shows are hard [on working-out]. I do boxing with this guy, Dudley. He used to be a boxer for like eleven years. He’s a friend, but he trains me one-on-one, which is nice. When I work out, I don’t just like to sit there. I like to go for a goal—to get better—because I used to play soccer. Sometimes I just don’t like to do crunches because they’re crunches. I’d rather punch!   Rianne van Rompaey   The Indulgence: I really love chocolate. Dark chocolate, or with pecans and salt and chili. Everything can be in it, and it’s all fine with me. I love Côte D’Or. I don’t know if they have it in America? It’s good—really intense. The Workout: For exercise, I work out at Crunch gym because it’s huge and I can take a lot of different classes anytime of the day, which is perfect for Fashion Week. I like to do step [classes]. You go off and on and off. It’s really fun!   Maartje Verhoef   The Indulgence: My favorite treats are nuts and salty snacks! I prefer them to sweets! The Workout: My favorite way to work out is boxing because you just forget everything; you can make your mind empty. It’s a great workout. And I like to do yoga. I sleep so well after yoga because I’m totally relaxed and it feels really good.

    The post 6 Models on Their Favorite Valentine’s Day Sweet Treats—and the Best Workouts to Burn Them Off appeared first on Vogue.


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    Backstage at Derek Lam’s fall 2015 show, models’ leather-accented ponytails called to mind the 1970s mood of era icon Ali MacGraw.

    The post Why the ’70s-Inspired Ponytails at Derek Lam Will Have You Streaming Love Story Tonight appeared first on Vogue.


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    “Carolina wanted it to look as though the girls just came out of the water,” explained makeup artist Diane Kendal backstage at Carolina Herrera this morning. A jarring thought, perhaps, for those who drove past ice floes in the Hudson River en route to the Lincoln Center Theater—but infused with the designer’s signature elegance, the idea suddenly felt glamorous and inviting. Only in Herrera’s world, after all, does one emerge from the sea with matte raspberry lipstick—created, in this case, using MAC’s Retro Matte Liquid Lip Colour in Oh, Lady (out next fall). Echoing the aquatic undercurrent in the collection (rippling prints, oceanic pastels, splashes of lighthouse red), Kendal was busy transforming Karlie Kloss, Fei Fei Sun, Imaan Hammam, and other landlocked models into “water sirens” by dabbing MAC clear Lipglass onto the eyelids to create a pretty, reflective surface that offered up fresh new possibilities for evening makeup come fall; she also applied strategic hits of highlighter—above the brows, along the cheekbones, down the bridge of the nose—for a sunlit glow. Adding an unexpectedly dewy element were models’ false lashes: Each embellished strip had been dotted with a few light-catching silicone beads and dusted with silver glitter “to give a water droplet effect,” said Kendal, holding a glinting pair up to the light. Across the hall, the wet effect was even more tangible in hairstylist Orlando Pita’s hands, where he was dousing a model’s low ponytail with TRESemmé’s Smooth & Silky No Frizz Shine Spray. First, he slicked the hair straight back using a handful of gel. “You really feel the groove of the comb,”’ he said of the imperfect, fresh-from-the-pool texture. For the finishing touch, he wrapped—and wrapped and wrapped—a thin length of metallic leather (pewter for brunettes, silver for blondes) to form a tightly wound cuff. Consider us ready to heed this siren’s call.   We gave Karlie Kloss a GoPro for New York Fashion Week—Watch what happened:   See the Carolina Herrera fall 2015 collection:

    The post Why a Raspberry Matte Lip Suddenly Feels Fresh: Carolina Herrera’s Modern Makeup Moment appeared first on Vogue.


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    To a seemingly endless list of top-tier fashion houses—Prada, Dolce & Gabbana, and Louis Vuitton among them—makeup artist Pat McGrath is the creative force behind the directional beauty looks that emerge on their runways each season, from exaggerated plumed brows (Alexander McQueen) to glittering, full-face masks (Givenchy). But to her legions of model fans, who walk in those shows each season, the British powerhouse is also a much-loved confidante—lending support and, naturally, makeup advice to those who settle into her chair. Backstage this week at the New York collections (where McGrath’s hand could be seen at Victoria Beckham, Kanye West x Adidas, and Diane von Furstenberg), we asked eight models to share one game-changing beauty lesson they’ve learned from the master herself. After all, Mother—as she’s often called—knows best.    

    The post Everything I Need to Know about Makeup, I Learned from Pat McGrath: 7 Models on Their Favorite Tricks from the Backstage Master appeared first on Vogue.


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    If the Marc Jacobs show each season is as much sublime spectacle as runway presentation, it also holds true that the casting has an equally theatrical bent, with a lineup of models carefully chosen to give life to the designer’s famously exacting vision. Backstage today at the cavernous Park Avenue Armory, it was a sea of impossibly lithe necks and intriguing faces, which called to mind—with their wine-color lips, angular wartime brows, and doll-like topknots—a Pina Bausch piece, a Weimar cabaret, or, perhaps, a twisted take on New York high society. “Marc really wanted those elegant swans from the fifties and sixties: Babe Paley, Marella Agnelli, all those fabulous socialites,” explained makeup artist François Nars. “He really tried to get women with character and to bring out that character as much as possible.” To that end, there were fresh, intriguing newcomers—like Cierra Skye, a doll-faced seventeen-year-old who made her runway debut earlier this week—as well as industry favorites like Erin O’Connor, who began working with Marc Jacobs in the nineties. For the London-based model, just off maternity leave, it’s been a homecoming of sorts, both to the world of Marc Jacobs and to the city of New York, which she called home early in her career. Here, the show opener speaks to Vogue.com about the designer’s steel-trap memory, her tough-love workouts post-baby, and the thrill of being back in the thick of it. It’s great to see you backstage! How long has it been since you’ve been in touch with Marc? It’s got to have been a decade. Last week I was pushing a pram, and this week, I’m walking the Marc Jacobs runway! I’m absolutely just going to embrace the experience. Were you expecting a call? No. Albert [her young son] was going to play school. It was, “Can you be on a plane to New York?” That’s the thing about Marc. He’s very loyal, and he has a photographic memory. He sort of honors the women he loves, so he always remembers the girls. If he thinks you’re an appropriate fit for a collection and he’s inspired by you, it doesn’t matter where you are, he’s going to find you and hunt you down. What brought you and Marc together two decades ago? In the era I worked in, [designers] were all about individuality and promoting as much as they could the idea of personality. That’s what Marc is. He really is very bold about his belief, and he doesn’t compromise—because we all know he’s not a follower, he’s an instigator. He loves a bit of attitude in a woman, and he loves the spirit of women from bygone eras, which, of course, is what [today’s show] is all about. You look great—any beauty secrets? I live my life, I have a nice time, but I’m all about the repair. So it’s preservation. You know, I love a glass of wine, but do then top off with two to three liters of water every day. Nothing fancy. I like Weleda Skin Food moisturizer. It’s great, organic, clean. I could use it when I was pregnant. I literally came off maternity leave in the New Year. It’s my first runway post-giving birth. Was it an easy transition back to modeling from giving birth? Well, I wouldn’t say that. I think I’ve worked really hard, and, of course, Albert comes first; things like nursing, you can’t rush that. I wanted to be fighting fit and strong, and that’s a process, too. I train with a really lovely woman in London. She has a sense of humor, which is great, but then she’s also tough. That’s why we’re together! It’s cardio for health and fitness, strength for physique, and it also just really helps me out mentally. It’s a great way to exhale the stresses of the day. What do you make of the look today, and how do you see yourself fitting into it? With Marc, it’s about characters. He’s celebrating the modern, strong women of today. That’s a nice one to stride out to, and I just realized I’m number one! You end up setting the pace [in the show], which is quite something. It’s a bit of a homecoming for you—to the runway, to the designer, to New York. It feels surreal in the best possible way. I think 20 years in, you’re very conscious of what you’re doing. You know everybody, and in a sense they know you, so it is a completely different experience. It is a real reunion. That’s what it feels like. It’s a lovely place to be. Watch Models at Marc Jacobs Tell Us Just What Songs Get Them Runway-Ready:

    The post Model Erin O’Connor on Her Return to the Marc Jacobs Runway—and the Call That Started It All appeared first on Vogue.


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    The last of the New York collections has sleep-deprived fashion insiders dreaming of a long, uninterrupted hibernation—during which we’ll muse about which feather-trimmed Rodarte dress to covet, which Alexander Wang creepers we’ll stalk the streets in, and, of course, which beauty looks to borrow come fall (or this weekend). Is it Altuzarra’s wash of pastel eye shadow, Victoria Beckham’s sleek updo, or Proenza Schouler’s gestural smear of black across the lids that warrants a revival? To suss it all out, we turned to a group with firsthand experience: Seven models who test-drove the looks down the runway. Here, their favorite beauty moments of the week. We Gave Makeup Artist James Kaliardos a GoPro—Watch What Happens

    The post 7 Models on Their Favorite Runway Beauty Moments from New York Fashion Week appeared first on Vogue.


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    A healthy new spin on the power lunch: straight from the greenmarket and right to your door. From the artfully styled grain bowls and matcha lattes on Instagram to an all-out craze for slow-simmered bone broth, the message is clear: The beauty-and-wellness set has become obsessed with nutrition. Today, eating virtuously isn’t just a means to stay trim; it’s a crucial step in fortifying the body for an increasingly fit, and busy, life. But in this multitasking age, where lunch comes with a side of email, everyone’s got a lot on their plate except, too often, a square meal. Answering the call across the country is a wave of enterprising young chefs, fashionable foodies, and tech pioneers who are marrying wholesome meals with door-to-door convenience. There’s something for every preference, from the superfood salad–loving vegetarian and hipster locavore to the Paleo-devoted triathlete. (Even Beyoncé has joined the fray, launching her own vegan service with 22 Days Nutrition.) If last year was dominated by the juice cleanse, this is shaping up to be the year of the designer meal delivery.   Sakara Life   When Arizona natives Danielle DuBoise and Whitney Tingle started working in New York after college, the city’s frenetic pace sent them searching for ways to get their health back on track. “We did everything under the sun,” says DuBoise, ticking off raw food, veganism, sweat-lodge retreats, and punishing cleanses. By 2011, they found their answer and launched Sakara Life, delivering nutrient-dense, plant-based meals to a coterie of fashionable fans including Lily Aldridge, Lena Dunham, and the staffs at Moda Operandi and Alexander Wang’s design studio. Four years later, the service has expanded along the East Coast and arrives in L.A. this summer. Sakara’s motto is simple: “Eat Clean Eat Whole.” Breakfast might be a vanilla-rooibos fig bar (“like a healthy Fig Newton,” notes DuBoise), followed by sunflower nori rolls and golden turmeric salad. The company takes a 360-degree approach to well-being, partnering earlier this year with cult Tribeca trainer Taryn Toomey, SoulCycle, and Tata Harper skin care. Five-day plan, from $130; sakaralife.com   Sprig   Farm-to-table dining doesn’t typically involve a smartphone app and delivery driver, but San Francisco’s Sprig is hardly typical. In the year and a half since its debut, the company has sourced more than 330,000 pounds of organic produce from nearby farmers, in addition to sustainably raised meat. With a daily-changing menu—usually three options for lunch, another three for dinner—the idea is to combine satisfaction with simplicity. “We want to make it easy to eat well,” says executive chef Nate Keller, who formerly led Google’s kitchens. Keller and fellow chef Jessica Entzel (an alum of Jean-Georges, Morimoto, and Wolfgang Puck) consult with an in-house nutritionist and also orchestrate collaborations with local luminaries like Cortney Burns and Nick Balla of Bar Tartine and Ichi Sushi’s Tim Archuleta. Not long after the Sprig team moved into its sprawling new Civic Center headquarters, the McDonald’s across the street closed—a coincidence not lost on a company setting out to redefine fast food. Lunch, from $9, dinner, from $10; sprig.com Nourish Kitchen + Table   Over the years, New York nutritionist Marissa Lippert, R.D., heard a persistent refrain: Her clients were clamoring for takeout food that was greenmarket-driven. So in the summer of 2013 she opened up her own storefront, where the seasonal menu veers from local cod with lemon to shaved-vegetable salad to immune-boosting elixirs. This year, Lippert has added a “curated cleanse” delivery program. For each plan—from three days up to a month—she crafts a personalized menu that mirrors her well-rounded approach to nutrition: local vegetables, hearty grains, juices, thoughtfully sourced meat and fish. “Eating well,” she says, “should not be rocket science.” Cleanse, from $310; nourishkitchentable.com   Munchery   In 2011, two tech-world dads, Tri Tran and Conrad Chu, set about reengineering the food-delivery model by enlisting a network of notable Bay Area chefs. Each night in San Francisco—and now, Seattle and New York—Munchery offers more than a dozen entrées dreamed up by local talent. The emphasis is on the sustainable, seasonal, and small-batch. Up-front labeling makes it easy for those avoiding nuts, gluten, dairy, or meat; the site also lists ingredient and nutrition facts. The meals, which arrive chilled, come in retro-style plaid containers with compostable trays that can be popped directly into the microwave or oven. Call it a dressed-up TV dinner for the Netflix age. Dinner, from $10; munchery.com   Fixed Foods   Gerry Flynn, an Austin-based tech entrepreneur, discovered the Paleo lifestyle by necessity. “My wife has an autoimmune disease, and we tried a variety of diets—pescatarian, vegetarian, a whole host of things—to minimize her symptoms.” Eventually they landed upon the caveman diet, which not only proved effective, it also got Flynn thinking beyond his own kitchen. Last summer, he introduced Fixed Foods, a service that abides by Paleo’s strict tenets: pasture-raised meats, organic vegetables, no grains, dairy, or refined sweeteners. While a third of his clients are Paleo die-hards (and fellow CrossFitters), the rest are simply curious and time-strapped. “If you just want a no-brainer healthy meal, Paleo is a really straightforward way to eat,” says Flynn. The menu is anything but Flintstonian, with Laotian lettuce wraps alongside reimagined Southern favorites like baked chicken with sweet-potato waffles. The new 30-day reset program includes three to four meals a day plus consultations with a Fixed Foods coach. “Your body’s addicted to certain things, so you’re going to have to push through that,” Flynn says. The newfound energy at the end, he adds, is worth it. Five-meal order, $60; fixedfoods.com Prop Stylist: JoJo Li; Food Styling by Michelle Gatton at Stockland Martel Les Maisons Enchantées plate by Hermès

    The post The New Power Lunch: 5 Healthy Meal Delivery Services to Try Now​​ appeared first on Vogue.


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    Next month, when the parade of Met Gala attendees streams through the latest Costume Institute exhibition, “China: Through the Looking Glass,” they will be met with a visual feast that spans centuries and continents. A slinky one-shoulder dress by Tom Ford for Yves Saint Laurent calls to mind a Qing Dynasty court robe; a voluminous Roberto Cavalli design reinterprets blue-and-white porcelain. Of course, China has supplied the fashion world with more than just inspiration: An increasing number of today’s most sought-after models call the country home. With that in mind, we tracked down six runway favorites, from all-star Liu Wen to newcomer Luping Wang, to talk about local beauty traditions and the skin-care lessons passed down from mothers and grandmothers. LIU WEN   The 27-year-old Yongzhou native, known for her winsome dimples and sporty street style, celebrates her fifth anniversary as a face of Estée Lauder this month (she’s the first China-born model to hold the title). These days she shuttles between New York City and Beijing, “but most of the time I feel like I live in airports all over the world,” Wen says. Her powerhouse status is clear no matter how you crunch the numbers: 855,000 followers on Instagram—and another nine million on the Chinese microblogging site, Weibo. What’s your first childhood beauty memory? My mom styled her hair a certain way: shoulder-length and curly. As a child, I thought that was very womanly. She was also very good at putting on eyeliner, but it wasn’t via makeup. She would go to a beauty parlor and have the black outlines lasered on! Any local beauty rituals you observed at home? We used raw egg whites directly as face masks. Of course, there were cucumbers on the eyes, too! For Chinese New Year, we drew a red dot at the center of our foreheads; I think it was for good fortune. It went along well with the red clothing we were expected to wear for the holiday. Can you define the Chinese beauty ideal? Where I’m from, good skin was a great indicator of beauty. But on the inside, beauty always meant a woman with a warm heart and a diligent spirit. Who is your beauty icon? My true icon is my mom, but outside of the family, the actress Gong Li was one for myself and many others. Any natural remedies you swear by? I love to boil the fruits of the Chinese soap-pod locust tree in water and use that as shampoo. You can also boil wormwood plants in water and use it as soap for the skin; it helps reduce irritation and rashes. And whenever I go back to China, I buy a lot of red dates and goji berries. They’re great to put in water, tea, or congee to drink or eat. The result helps your skin stay healthy and glowing.   FEI FEI SUN   With her regal cheekbones and wide-set eyes, the 26-year-old has become a regular in the pages of Vogue and appeared on the magazine’s cover this past September alongside her fellow Instagirls. Hailing from Weifang, in Shangdong Province, the model has logged miles on the runways (including Chanel, Givenchy, and Alexander Wang) and on the streets of Manhattan, her adopted hometown. What’s your first childhood beauty memory? My mother’s red lips and her curly hair—when I was six years old, she would bring me to the hairdresser. Any local beauty habits you observed at home? My mother often told me to apply sunscreen before I went outside in the summer. She was insistent upon it, even on days when the sunshine wasn’t so strong. What hometown health or wellness rituals do you miss? Healthy eating was emphasized because my parents love vegetables so much. We ate light meals prepared with less salt and oil. My mother cooked red date soup for me once a week, with walnuts, brown sugar, goji, longan meat, and red bean. My hometown has a tradition of cooking this soup because it’s really good for skin and health. Can you define the Chinese beauty ideal? Smooth skin, beautiful bright eyes, and a feminine smile. Who is your beauty icon? I have always looked up to my mother; family is very important to me. Outside of our home, I looked up to Gong Li. She’s such a beautiful woman! XIAO WEN JU   There’s an undeniable sparkle to the energetic 22-year-old—and we’re not just talking about the Swarovski eye embellishments she wore when she closed the recent Rodarte show. Raised in Xi’an, she appeared with fellow cool kids Binx Walton, Cara Delevingne, and Sam Rollinson in the spring DKNY campaign that entertained many a taxi-riding New Yorker (of which she is one); she also cruised around Paris with Zoolander’s Derek and Hansel after their Valentino cameo. What’s your first childhood beauty memory? My grandma really liked using powder. She always looked chic, with her white face, red lips, and red nail polish. The only thing my mom wears is lipstick. I don’t remember the color [back then], but I still remember the taste because when she wasn’t home I tried on her lipsticks. What beauty or health rituals from home did you take with you? [Growing up,] my mom didn’t want me to wear any makeup. She just wanted me to have really good skin. In the summertime, she said, “Don’t go into the sun. You need an umbrella!” And she asked me to go to sleep earlier and eat healthily—fruits, vegetables. It’s all about the inside health. In my hometown, we don’t care about makeup. The only thing we really like are masks to help your skin. I use a clay mask, and also the white of the egg. I do it three times a week. Any natural remedies you swear by? My father cooks pork bone soup. He makes a huge, huge pot, and we drink it every day, before lunch or dinner. When you make the soup, all the pork bone’s nutrients [are released]. It’s good for collagen—it’s beauty soup! Can you define the Chinese beauty ideal? People here in New York City think there are so many different beauties, not only one type. In China, we still like big eyes and a high nose—that’s the classic beauty in China, although I think that’s going to change. Women curl their eyelashes; also, they put double-stick tape on their eyelids to make the eyes bigger. I did that too when I was living there! Who’s your beauty icon? Wang Fei [also known as Faye Wong], the singer. Watching her on MTV has been an inspiration. Also Gong Li, the actress. She’s an iconic Chinese beauty, for me—long hair, really strong face. Maggie Cheung, too. SHU PEI QIN   Over the past five years, the 25-year-old from Kaifeng has parlayed her sculptural features and steady gaze into Maybelline ads, a Gap campaign, and, most recently, tours down the fall runways for Altuzarra and Chanel. She now splits her time between Shanghai and New York City. What’s your first childhood beauty memory? We used peach blossoms to paint our nails before the Chinese New Year. We picked them from our backyard. We would grind the petals, put them on our nails, and then wrap each nail with a leaf. Then we’d take them off the next morning, and we would have beautiful pink nails. Can you define the Chinese beauty ideal? Where I’m from, a few extra pounds give a more pleasing shape—a round face and big eyes. Who’s your beauty icon? Fan Bingbing, because she uses masks all the time. She takes really good care of her skin. Any natural remedies you swear by? I buy a lot of pu’erh tea to take to New York City. It’s a Chinese tea, produced in the Yunnan province. It cleanses the body. What’s your favorite health or fitness destination in China? I do NTC—Nike Training Club—at MFT studio in Shanghai. LUPING WANG   The up-and-coming 22-year-old model from Sichuan walked in some three-dozen shows for fall, transitioning effortlessly from flushed cheeks at Michael Kors to graphic winged liner at Chanel to sporty ponytail at Stella McCartney. There’s a feline sensibility to her distinctive beauty, giving us the sense that she’ll roam far. What’s your first childhood beauty memory? My mother liked to wear lipstick and loved hats. She always looked elegant. What’s the best beauty lesson you learned at home? My mom loves cleansing and moisturizing. She taught me to keep my skin clean, eat lots of fruit, and drink plenty of water, which is essential to keep the skin moisturized. Growing up, we had a very healthy diet and regular exercise. My mother and I still like to take long walks when I am home. Can you define the Chinese beauty ideal? With time passing, I think that beauty is not just about how you look on the outside, but, more important, who you are and how you think. Inner beauty becomes very important with age. Who’s your beauty icon? I like Fei Fei Sun. She is so lovely in person. Gong Li, she is an icon for Chinese women: elegant, smart, and great acting skills. She also loves charity; she has a big heart. Any at-home rituals you swear by? I like doing facials, so facial masks are important to me. I use The Face Shop a lot. It helps me to clean my skin, especially to remove makeup. JING WEN   This cinematic beauty from Guangzhou has the face for a wide-angle lens—strong brows, pillowy lips, hair that cascades over the shoulders. Now based in New York City, the 21-year-old has walked in a number of directional shows in the past few seasons, including Valentino, Louis Vuitton, Marni, and Proenza Schouler for fall. What’s your first childhood beauty memory? When I was a little girl, I liked to smell my mother’s hair. It was very clean and thick, with a delicate fragrance. What’s the best beauty lesson you learned at home? My mother and grandmother would often have to remind me to keep my nails very short and neat. They believed food for cosmetic effect is better than beauty products—for example, some soup with red dates. Being influenced by mom and grandma, I will often drink some good-for-the-skin soup or herbal tea. Can you define the Chinese beauty ideal? Most people don’t like too-thin girls, and a lot of women like skin that is very white. Who are your beauty icons? Gong Li and Maggie Cheung are my favorite Chinese actresses! I hope when I am 50 years old I can also be so elegant and beautiful. Any favorite products from back home? These are five classic Chinese products: Bee & Flower hair products; Helen Ou Dabao SOD honey moisturizer, Pechoin cream, Longliqi snake oil, and Liushen Florida Water.  

    The post 6 Chinese Models Share Their Hometown Beauty Secrets: From Egg-White Face Masks to Peach-Blossom Nails appeared first on Vogue.


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    It has been a multicultural week on the gala circuit: Monday at the Met, all eyes were on China’s enduring influence on fashion; last night at New York City Ballet’s Spring Gala, the spotlight was on Denmark, birthplace of the great nineteenth-century choreographer, August Bournonville. Known for his effervescent footwork and repertory rich in pantomime, Bournonville might seem a world away from the modernist compositions by George Balanchine, the visionary founder of NYCB. In the spirit of spring renewal, the evening’s anticipated premiere was a revival of the Dane’s 1836 story ballet, La Sylphide, and a crowd including Valentino Garavani, Elettra Wiedemann, Patti Smith, and Ansel Elgort arrived to take it all in. “I have a soft spot for Romantic ballets,” confessed Indre Rockefeller in daffodil yellow Delpozo, looking every bit the former dancer she is. Justin Peck, the company’s wunderkind resident choreographer and a soloist, paused to underscore the importance of the classics. “I actually haven’t seen any of the rehearsals for the piece, so I’m excited to just sit back and be a spectator,” he said. Wiedemann glided by in blush pink Lanvin, and on her feet? “Lanvin—not pointe shoes, thankfully,” she said with a laugh, showing off a sparkly sandal with a sensible heel. Growing up, her mother, Isabella Rossellini, used to take her to the ballet every year; Olivia Palermo, who seemingly walked out of Botticelli’s Primavera in a botanical Valentino dress, also has a balletomane in the family. “My mother just came last night! She has season tickets.” Moments later inside the David H. Koch Theater, the curtain rose to reveal the first piece on the program, Bournonville Divertissements, a tasting menu of buoyant, jump-heavy excerpts by the choreographer. After a brief intermission on the terrace with champagne and a waning sunset, it was time for La Sylphide, staged by the company’s Danish-born ballet master in chief, Peter Martins. Set in Scotland, the story centers on a tartan-clad cad (a triumphant Joaquin De Luz) who jilts his betrothed for a winged sylph (Sterling Hyltin); she arrives by window and departs (to chuckles from the audience) by chimney. Their love affair ends in tragedy when he wraps a scarf—secretly cursed by a witch—around his paramour, causing her to perish, her delicate wings fluttering to the ground. Heavy stuff for a spring night, but the mood was light at the post-show dinner on the promenade. The ethereal Wendy Whelan, who retired last fall from the company and appears at the Joyce Theater later this month, gushed about Hyltin’s performance, adding, “It’s my birthday—48!” Andrew Rannells, in the midst of filming the fifth season of Girls, chatted with Tiler Peck, a City Ballet principal whose husband, Robert Fairchild, stars in Broadway’s An American in Paris. “He plays the role that Gene Kelly did in the film,” Garavani explained. “I’m going to see it next week!” And with that, like a corps of winged sylphs, the guests dispersed into the night. Meanwhile, on the West Coast, a very rainy Hollywood evening set the stage for the premiere of Mad Max: Fury Road. As action-packed as the movie was, it didn’t outshine the equally exciting red carpet. Hollywood veteran and star Charlize Theron shed her movie look and opted for a clean black and white dress, while newcomer costar Zoë Kravitz looked elegant in a Valentino gown, paired well with her signature braids. The biggest surprise of the night was when original Mad Max star, Mel Gibson, came out to show his support for the newest chapter of the legacy. As guests filed into the theater, Riley Keough in a leather dress, stopped for a few selfies with fans, then joined Abbey Lee, in a Balmain jumpsuit, inside. As the credits rolled, the night was just beginning. Guests ventured across the street for the after-party, where in one corner, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley stunned in a sparkling Rodarte skirt and top. Across the room, costar Nicholas Hoult was seen laughing and talking amongst friends. Mad Max’s star-studded cast definitely failed to disappoint, both on the screen and on the carpet.

    The post Valentino, Patti Smith, and More Celebrate New York City Ballet’s Spring Gala and Mel Gibson, Charlize Theron, and Other Stars Come Out for the Mad Max: Fury Road Premiere appeared first on Vogue.


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    In the galaxy of Korean pop stars, street-style arbiters, and beauty tastemakers, model and television personality Irene Kim is a planet with some serious gravitational pull. Since moving to Korea three years ago after studying textile design at New York’s FIT, the 27-year-old Seattle native has amassed a heavyweight following—550,000 on Instagram alone, where her posts document everything from an impromptu backstage selfie at last May’s Chanel resort collection to an original short film for designer Stella McCartney to, most recently, a birthday tribute to her grandmother. “I get all my sense of style from her #GRANDMAMA,” read the caption to their smiling black-and-white portrait together. “I would always play in my grandma’s makeup box—with her lipstick and her eye shadow,” Kim recalls, speaking by phone from Seoul last week. “That’s my earliest memory, when I was four years old. There’s a candid picture of me caught red-handed!” Now, in her just-announced role as Estée Lauder’s global beauty contributor, she’ll have an endless supply of the company’s makeup and skin care at her fingertips, including the Advanced Night Repair serum (which she snuck from her mom in high school and still uses) and Little Black Primer, her go-to off-duty mascara (“not too heavy—it’s perfect”). While her plans to create content with the company—from instructional how-to videos and predicting the next big Korean beauty trend to potentially consulting on product development—are still in the works, you can expect a heavy dose of social media and in-the-moment spontaneity right now. “I want to show people that beauty is for everyone, and it’s all about experimenting,” she says. “I’m so excited just to play.” That spirit of adventure has become a signature for Kim, whose hair has been an ever-evolving kaleidoscope of color over the past couple years. “I didn’t even tell my agency I was going to dye it blue because I knew they wouldn’t let me,” she says of taking the initial plunge. “Now, they’re like, ‘You can’t dye it black!’ ” With the help of her trusted hairstylist, Sunwoo Kim, she reimagines the palette every few weeks. “In the summer I like to do warmer pink tones, and then in fall-winter I go back into cooler tones,” she explains. Almost like a mood ring? “It’s definitely a recharge for me. When I feel sad, I go and my hair’s rainbow again!” Beyond her new-media reach, Kim is a familiar face on television, cohosting the popular show K-Style in English on Mnet America as well as Korea’s Style Live. At the end of the month, the tireless globetrotter is off to Los Angeles for KCon—“a huge K-pop concert-slash-convention,” she explains—where her current favorite group, Sistar, is performing. “Their makeup and fashion are just amazing,” says Kim. For more of her finger-on-the-pulse updates on all things Korean, stay tuned.

    The post Exclusive! Meet the Korean It Girl That’s About to Change Your Makeup Bag appeared first on Vogue.


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    Meet four trailblazing florists bringing together the flower market and the fragrance counter. Today, the word bouquet calls to mind bridal confections more visual than olfactory, but rewind a few centuries, to the Georgian and Victorian eras, and the nosegay—as the handheld floral sprays were charmingly known—was the de rigueur accessory for fashionable ladies (and quite a few gentlemen). After all, modern hygiene was still far in the distance, and sweet-smelling flowers, often jauntily pinned to a bodice or waistcoat, offered a twist on wearable perfume. No one understands the allure of heady peonies or lilies of the valley better than those who spend their days weaving them into elaborate displays—even though, as Los Angeles florist Eric Buterbaugh explains, “it’s really hard to get any fragrant flowers anymore. They’ve bred the scent out of so many things.” No matter: He and a handful of compatriots from the floral realm are busily crafting intoxicating distractions of their own, in the form of garden-inspired perfumes, soaps, candles, and bath products. And, unlike their ephemeral blooms, these come with a long shelf life.   Eric Buterbaugh, Eric Buterbaugh Florals   L.A.’s florist-about-town supplies opulent arrangements for Chanel dinners, Oscar parties, and private clients like Demi Moore and Tom Ford. For Buterbaugh’s namesake fragrance collection, he singled out seven flowers—violet, hyacinth, tuberose, lily of the valley, lavender, jasmine, and rose—and translated them, with the help of master noses, into subtly layered perfumes. “They’re luxurious but not precious,” he says. The weighty etched-crystal vessels, designed after vintage decanters, are the centerpiece of his new perfumery-cum-gallery in West Hollywood. ebflorals.com   Ariel Dearie, Royal Botanicals   Based in Brooklyn, Dearie is known for her poetic arrangements (Marc Jacobs is a weekly client), her floral styling for photographers Steven Meisel and Annie Leibovitz, and a line of handmade salt soaks called Royal Botanicals. “I really love the ritual of baths,” she says, recalling her seven-foot-long claw-foot tub in a former apartment. Standout blends include one perfumed with geranium leaves (“They leave an amazing scent on your hands”), and her original bergamot, stocked in the minibars at New York’s NoMad Hotel. arieldearieflowers.com   Saskia Havekes, Grandiflora   Outside Grandiflora’s studio in Sydney, a stately magnolia grandiflora tree blooms each spring. “I never tire of it,” says Havekes, who launched her fragrance line with two interpretations (each named for its French perfumer): Sandrine, when the flower is cracking open, and Michel, when it’s fully blown. Grandiflora’s third scent, Stephanotis—after the waxy Madagascan jasmine—debuts next month, along with a pair of candles produced by Cire Trudon. grandiflora.net   Taylor Patterson, Fox Fodder Farm   Patterson’s floral and landscape-design studio in Brooklyn is a go-to resource among fashion’s creative set: She styled the arrangements for jewelry designer Pamela Love’s wedding and has worked with brands like Aesop and Shinola; next month, she hosts a pop-up flower market in Paris at Le Bon Marché. Working with a local perfumer, she developed two oil blends—Wood (“like sawdust mixed with hay, a very nostalgic scent for me”) and Flower (rose with vetiver)—used in her soaps. She also just launched a rosewood-laced candle, Summer, and a nourishing balm perfect for gardeners’ weathered hands. foxfodderfarm.com

    The post Are Florists the New Perfumers? 4 Fragrance Labels You Need to Know Now appeared first on Vogue.


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    When model and Estée Lauder face Joan Smalls arrived at last year’s Met Gala, it wasn’t just her floor-sweeping nude Vera Wang dress that caused a stir on the red carpet; it was the arresting shade of violet painted onto her lips. Even at an event known for extreme fashion risks, it was a bold move—one that sparked a flurry of purple-lipped selfies in response on Instagram. “I started seeing people tag me after the Met Gala,” Smalls recalls, speaking by phone last week from her native Puerto Rico. “I was like, ‘This is so cool. People are really reacting to it in a very positive way.’ ” The unexpected fervor planted a seed in her mind for a future lipstick collaboration, and today it finally comes to fruition with the launch of twelve vibrant shades developed with Estée Lauder. “I’m very hands-on when I’m involved with something,” she says with a laugh, and that close attention to detail shines through in the collection’s supersaturated colors, including Neon Azalea (an effervescent pink), Commanding (a black cherry pigment, its name chosen by her Instagram followers), and two takes on statement purple: Extrovert (a spot-on eggplant) and Shameless Violet, which bears striking resemblance to that gala-tested shade. What does it take to pull off such a color? “Confidence!” she exclaims. “It’s all about self-expression. Just go with your heart and your mood. If you don’t want to go as bold, pat it down with a tissue and use it as a tint,” she advises. “Baby steps.” Texture is just as important to Smalls, who insisted on a matte formula—it’s chicer, she says, and easier to maintain than a high-shine lipstick—that nonetheless “feels creamy rather than dry and flaky.” In other words, it’s the type of lipstick that can last through dinner with her boyfriend, as proved last Thursday when she paired a wearable neutral (Covetous Nude) with “a lot, a lot of lashes” for a night out in Old San Juan. Even though Smalls counts herself a late convert to lip color—she remembers her mother asking her, “Aren’t you going to put lipstick on?”—the model plans on making up for lost time with a full arsenal to choose from (all permanent additions to the Estée Lauder line). “You shouldn’t have certain rules or restrictions,” she muses of her adventurous approach to color. “It’s like painting: You have to have fun with it!”

    The post Exclusive! Model Joan Smalls on Her 12 New Matte Lipsticks for Estée Lauder appeared first on Vogue.


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    Another day, another I’ll-have-what-she’s-having elixir. And yet, in the midst of activated-charcoal tonics, slow-simmered bone broths, and nut milks spiked with turmeric, the most compelling health brew of the moment isn’t exactly new. Tea, naturally rich in antioxidants and low in sugar, is experiencing a major fashion and wellness renaissance—and if a quick look around is any indication, it may be poised to become the next green juice. In recent seasons, models have declared allegiance to energy-boosting herbal blends backstage, with Kendall Jenner professing her love for Kusmi Tea’s BB Detox, a mix of green tea, maté, and guarana, among other ingredients. Meanwhile, matcha—the powdered bright-green tea that appeals to purists and the whole of Instagram—has given rise to cafés like Chalait, a jewel box in Manhattan’s West Village; you can also find it on the menu at the nearby Equinox (virtuous) and in a new custard pie at Brooklyn’s Four & Twenty Blackbirds (deliciously less so). And among those shaping how we think about beauty today—from Reiki-practicing facialists to herb-focused shopkeepers committed to impeccable sourcing—it’s increasingly top of mind. “Beauty tea is the next wave,” says Jessica Richards, owner of Brooklyn boutique Shen, known for its curated mix of natural-focused skin care and in-house facials. For a glowing complexion, she says, “It goes back to what you eat”—and drink. Richards regularly brews Egyptian licorice tea, citing its anti-inflammatory properties, and starting this week, she’s stocking the new Sleepy Cow tea from the U.K. brand (and Soho House favorite) Cowshed. The elegantly packaged lemon-chamomile blend, developed with the London-based Joe’s Tea Co., will be on offer post-treatment at Shen this fall for an extra dose of calm. In the meantime, why not try facialist Negin Niknejad’s Love Potion? Inspired by her cosmically connected client, jewelry designer Pamela Love, the tea—made with heirloom roses, violet, nettle, cardamom, and other poetically charged ingredients—is one of four variations available as part of her JustBe skin-care line. Niknejad, in the midst of a three-year apprenticeship with an herbalist, also creates custom blends to support immune health and aid sleep. According to Niknejad, technique is everything: “I always recommend to steep your teas overnight,” she says of combining boiling water and herbs in a large Mason jar before refrigerating it the next morning. “Once you make an infusion”—as opposed to a quick-brewed cup—“that’s when it’s actually medicinal.” Ritual is essential to this new wave of tea-drinkers, from Niknejad, who recently hosted a full-moon tea gathering at her New York City studio, to Baelyn Elspeth, a Los Angeles native who leads Taoist-inspired tea ceremonies in dreamy locales (Venice Beach, cedar forests), where flower crowns and drums occasionally make an appearance. At New York’s CAP Beauty, a wellness boutique in the West Village, the sensorial aspects of tea extend to its facials, which often incorporate chamomile and green tea infusions. Later this fall, the company will launch a private-label organic matcha, which entails its own meditative ritual. Expect in-store tastings, along with handsome teacups by local ceramist Romy Northover. It follows that cleanse diehards have moved on to “teatoxing,” which makes some occasionally questionable weight-loss claims. “I don’t know about teatoxes,” says Frank Lipman, M.D., the New York integrative medicine expert who is no stranger to cleanses (his two-week version is a recurring topic of conversation in the Vogue offices), but he stands behind tea’s numerous benefits. “You get slightly different antioxidants and catechins and polyphenols” in different types, says Lipman, who drinks his way through the spectrum: black and green tea by day; rooibos by night. “In South Africa, we all grew up with rooibos tea,” says the Johannesburg-born doctor. “[It] was, in a way, like a catch-all remedy.” And it’s once again having a major moment, popping up in Aloha’s new Beauty Tea (along with sea buckthorn berry and hibiscus flower), in Sakara’s Detox Tea (with rose petals and stomach-soothing linden flowers), and in the free-radical fighting Cocoa Rooibos blend from L.A. boutique Chay, developed with the medicinal tea atelier Wilwand. Of course, there may be some logic to tea’s moderating effects on mood and late-afternoon cravings. “You start drinking a tea a day, and maybe you don’t need that second cup of coffee,” says CAP Beauty co-founder Cindy DiPrima. It’s certainly well worth clearing some space on your desk for The Office Blend, from the artisanal herb company Daphnis and Chloe, featuring irresistibly chic packaging by Nathalie Du Pasquier, the Milan-based artist and Memphis Group cofounder. Made with rosehip, Greek mountain tea, thyme flowers, and peppermint, it’s designed to enhance alertness—and weaning off cold brew has never tasted (or looked) so good.

    The post Is Tea the New Juice? How the Original Beauty Blend Is Making a Major Comeback appeared first on Vogue.


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    A quick perusal of New York trainer Nicole Winhoffer’s Instagram account includes a recent post-class group portrait. The caption reads, “Just another Sunday at #nwchurch.” The analogy works well for the fitness star tasked with chiseling Madonna’s famously ageless body for five years; Winhoffer, who joined Adidas by Stella McCartney as its first global ambassador in 2014, has garnered a number of devoted congregants of late—Rachel Weisz, Charlotte Ronson, and Spike Jonze among them. After leading her impossible-to-book workouts at a rented space downtown, Winhoffer is finally getting a place of her own. The NoHo studio, set to open later this fall, will offer her signature classes—dimly lit power hours that blend intense muscle toning and club-friendly cardio—as well as new offerings, like interval training and dance choreography. With a juice-and-coffee bar in the works, the space is intended to be “like a sanctuary inside New York,” Winhoffer says, albeit a high-energy iteration sound-tracked by the dulcet tones of Rihanna. For more information: nicolewinhoffer.com

    The post Where to Go in New York City for the Ultimate Power Workout This Fall appeared first on Vogue.


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    Is there a tool in the makeup artist’s kit more ubiquitous, more referential, more endlessly versatile than black eyeliner? During the month of fashion shows ahead, we can expect to see just about all possible permutations (from Bardot wing to morning-after smear), and the start of the New York collections today offered the first case study: a bold-stroke, dialed-up cat-eye at Creatures of the Wind.   “The inspiration essentially came from Siouxsie Sioux,” makeup artist Aaron de Mey said backstage, referring to the British rocker and style icon known for her wildly theatrical looks. “The thing is, you never see a picture with identical eye makeup.” He was applying that same theme-and-variations approach to the band of models before him. The starting point across all faces (from the flame-haired Varya Shutova to the Angolan beauty Maria Borges) was an upswept, “aerodynamic” cat-eye, precisely painted on with an angled brush using NARS Eye Paint in Black Valley. The next set of models got a hit of gold glitter, dusted in a half-moon atop a slick of eye gloss—glinting, but still this side of glam rock. And the last group went full tilt: high-wattage sparkle, applied in a crisp vertical swath (thanks to deft corrections with surgical tape) from the inner corners of the eyes all the way up to the brows. If the makeup had serious edge, the hair—disheveled with “lived-in-for-days texture,” as hairstylist Anthony Turner put it—lent a flirtier touch, with a loosely rolled twist bobby-pinned to one side of the face and a quite-literal knot tied at the nape (a real-girl technique Turner picked up from his Shoreditch tattoo artist this summer). That sort of juxtaposition—romantic meets rock—was top of mind for designers Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters, whose show notes spoke of “creating a new language out of discordant components.” While we’ll have to wait till spring for that clash of patterned moto jackets and bohemian flowers, that Siouxsie Sioux makeup is the new language we’ll be speaking—or, better yet, singing at full volume—tonight.

    The post Why Black Liner, Gold Glitter, and Surgical Tape Are the Secret to Your Fashion Week After-Party Look appeared first on Vogue.


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