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    I have never owned a women’s razor. Even from the very beginning (a bare-bones silver Gillette Sensor Excel, circa late 1990s), my minimalist-leaning tastes led me to the men’s aisle and far, far away from anything resembling a pink plastic plaything. There was the spare Lucite-handled Pecksniff’s razor (since discontinued) that I inherited from an old boyfriend; I later made space on the shower shelf for Harry’s first-generation Winston razor, in a gleaming chrome finish. It’s not that I necessarily forsake all models thoughtfully created to suit the contours of a woman’s body. I just want one designed in the spirit of, say, Charlotte Perriand, the great 20th-century modernist partial to tubular-steel furniture and ball-bearing necklaces. Which is why Mave, a new shaving collection spotlighted in the August issue of Vogue, is such a refreshing addition. Launched by Marisa Newman, a former gallerist who laughs that her lifelong interests have been “art and depilation,” the six-piece line elevates the basics, beginning with the custom razor—a sculptural, easy-to-grip white resin object that bears a striking resemblance to Brancusi’s marble Bird in Space. While the design celebrates form, the blade is all industry-tested function: After considerable market research, Newman manufactured her razor to fit Gillette Venus heads, which she buys in bulk and handsomely repackages in slide-top paper boxes (at no extra cost), effectively bypassing the locked cases at the drugstore. That refined sensibility extends to the rest of her ritual, which includes a chamomile-laced scrub, a body oil with soothing arnica and aloe, and a shave cream featuring a gentle coconut-derived surfactant. Of course, she, too, borrows from the boys: There’s a British-style shaving brush made with cruelty-free synthetic bristles that mimic classic badger. Fortunately, the shaving landscape is fast evolving, and it’s increasingly feasible to assemble a handsome arsenal—for him, for her, for everyone. Here’s our guide to the new essentials, complete with an exfoliating wand for bikini season, a lemongrass-scented shave lotion, and the latest Winston razor, now with a rubberized grip for smoother sailing.  

    The post Razors Can Be Chic! Meet the New Shaving Staples That Will Upgrade Your Bathroom Game appeared first on Vogue.


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    In the fast-evolving world of skin care, masks are having a golden moment. There is a steady stream of eyebrow-raising novelties out of Korea, involving rubberized textures and bubbling pearl extracts. Meanwhile, other products carry on the farm-to-table ethos, like Fresh’s new Vitamin Nectar mask, spotlighted in the August issue of Vogue. A blend of crushed oranges, lemons, and clementines, the formula has the sensory appeal of teatime marmalade but comes loaded with antioxidants, gentle alpha-hydroxy acids, and revitalizing minerals like copper and zinc. But for those uninitiated in the art of masking, or for those looking to diversify their portfolio, it helps to have practical, real-world guidance. What’s the best summertime refresh? What to use after a long-haul flight? With that in mind, we’ve polled eight stylish and skin-savvy women for their tried-and-true rituals.  

    The post The Best Face Masks and the Chic Women Who Swear By Them appeared first on Vogue.


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    For some—barbecue enthusiasts, Southern belles, characters in John Grisham novels—there is no better cure for this languid stretch of summer than iced tea. Of course, sweet-as-pie Lipton isn’t the only route. Lately, those with a taste for ceremonial-grade matcha can find single-serve packets (by New York’s Chalait and Toronto’s Matcha Ninja) designed to be shaken into iced water. The Paris-based Kusmi Tea, a perennial model favorite, has also debuted seven blends with chilling in mind. And then there are gems hailing from farther afield—in the case of these five picks, from the wild Jiri mountains of Korea, where “there are no highways, no bullet trains flying by,” says Stefen Ramirez, the deeply knowledgeable tea dealer at Brooklyn’s Atelier TD. This summer, he is hosting monthly tea tastings at Treatment by Lanshin, the nearby wellness studio founded by the acupuncturist and herbalist Sandra Lanshin Chiu, L.Ac. Together, they have selected a group of summer-appropriate coolers with an equal eye toward delicate flavors and inside-out benefits. “Drinking something chilled is going to encourage the system to cool down just by the physical temperature alone,” says Chiu, who has long looked to the plant world for potent remedies. By zeroing in on the innate characteristics of a particular brew—hydrating wild pear; white lotus, which aids digestion—a glassful can offer more than refreshment, with properties that often dovetail with traditional Chinese medicine. While Ramirez’s single-origin teas (which by definition come from the Camellia sinensis or assamica plants) have antioxidant powers of their own, Chiu is especially drawn to his tisanes (herb-based varieties). “I focus a lot on treating dermatological conditions, which requires a very high-intensity herbal medicine that translates to ‘tastes disgusting,’ ” Chiu says with a laugh. “These are in line with what I prescribe medicinally, just in a lighter, more drinkable form.” Here, the two share notes on the flavor profiles and health benefits of each tea. Because brewing temperatures and methods draw out different characteristics, Ramirez also offers suggestions for cold-brewing, chilling, or icing down your drink of choice. An afternoon on the porch is all you need.    

    The post 5 Iced Teas With Health-Boosting Benefits—Picked by a Pair of Brooklyn Pros appeared first on Vogue.


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    Though Suicide Squad only hits theaters today, the buzz around the film has already reached full volume. Trailers featuring the ragtag crew of “super-villains,” including Margot Robbie’s psycho-punk Harley Quinn, have been widely shared; then there is all the talk of the real-world (if not exactly professional) ink that Robbie doled out among the tight-knit cast using the tattoo gun she got for her birthday. “Everybody was in; nobody questioned it,” says Karen Fukuhara, who plays the sword-slinging Katana, lifting up the hem of her pants to reveal a tiny scrawled SKWAD on her heel. Not that the 24-year-old California native needed a permanent reminder of the experience: This big-budget action movie also happens to be Fukuhara’s big-screen debut. This week, during a moment of calm between the New York and London premieres, the UCLA grad looked back on her breakout audition, when her well-honed karate skills and a friend’s borrowed practice sword scored her the part without an agent. As she told Vogue.com, prepping for the character’s fast-paced stunt work called for weeks of martial arts and strength training—while getting out of comic-book mode called for just the right skin care and shampoo. What was your childhood like? I was born and raised in Los Angeles; I’m still there! But both my parents are from Japan, so my first language was Japanese and I grew up with Japanese values, TV, food—everything. Outside of the house, I was a normal kid. How did the Suicide Squad audition go? The first audition was taped, and in the email it said, “If you have a sword lying around, make sure you bring it and do a little demonstration.” I was thinking, “Who has a sword lying around?” But sure enough, I had a friend who did, and he taught me all the ropes the day before. The second meeting was with David [Ayer, the director], and I did the same thing—martial arts, sword fighting, and an acting part. Somehow I ended up here! I didn’t have an agent when I got the movie, which is crazy. When did you get into martial arts? I started karate in middle school when my parents wanted me to babysit my younger brother. He was a little troublemaker, so they wanted me to make sure the class was going okay. I ended up being way more into it than my brother. I did competitions; I’ve flown to Japan to compete in the worldwide championships as well. I ended at a brown striped belt but then went off to college. So you had to get back into high gear for the role. Yes, it had been years; I lost a lot of the right kind of muscles. David really focused on the actors doing their own stunts because he wanted to create reality, and that’s the best way to do it. So we had a month and a half of preproduction [to train]. For me, I did sword fighting, martial arts, and fitness, but all of the training worked together. I would do the right kind of weight lifting so that I could lift the sword—and sword fighting is actually a lot of core. Who did you train with? I did martial arts with David’s old friend Richard Mesquita. And I got to work with Guy Norris, the second unit director, and Richard Norton, the fight coordinator—they worked on Mad Max: Fury Road. They’re the best in the industry for stunt work. By the end of it, I was able to do everything except for one dive roll. We had my lovely stunt double do that one. Margot does an amazing job playing Harley Quinn. She did all those stunts in heels! Was the training one-on-one? No, group. We all did rehearsals and training together. The rehearsals were more about an emotional connection, sharing stories and opening up to each other. But I personally think that the physical training bonded us as well because you’re punching each other; you’re stepping over personal spaces and boundaries. Humans don’t really have that kind of interaction nowadays, especially with technology—everyone’s behind a screen. Did you pay just as much attention to your diet? Well, I love food and I love carbs: Pasta, rice—that’s my thing. But for the movie, a lot of your physicality comes from not only training but your diet, too. I ate a lot of quinoa, greens, chicken breast. There wasn’t a nutritionist, but we did have meals that were specifically made for us. Given that you wear a mask, what was your hair and makeup like? They did a whole mold of my face, so the mask fit perfectly. I did sweat a lot during all the action scenes, and it would start sliding off; sometimes we’d put tape underneath to make sure it would stay. We used Dax Wax for my hair, and then for makeup, the most important feature was her scars. She has battle scars all over her body. What was your skin-care regimen during filming? I actually am very hands-off on my face. I like to use oil to take everything off, and then I cleanse after. I really like products from SK-II. My go-to when I feel gunky is the Clarisonic, but I don’t do that every day. How about that Dax Wax? It wouldn’t come out for a week! But we did reshoots in L.A. this year, and I found out about this Moroccanoil shampoo that essentially strips away all the product. Then the next day, it was completely clean—though you do need a good conditioner after. Now that filming is behind you, what’s your fitness routine like? I try to go to the gym. I either go on the rower or watch a TV show on the treadmill, and then I do some weight lifting. Having a trainer changes your life, it really does. I want to get back into that groove. And I just got back to the same karate dojo that I used to do in high school. Right now, the little kids are doing way better than I am! What do they think about you being in the movie? You know, I didn’t tell them. I just got an email from my sensei—my instructor—and he said, “I had no idea you were in this film!” I want to keep my private life kind of away from that, but it’s impossible with a movie like Suicide Squad. It’s everywhere!    

    The post Meet Karen Fukuhara, Suicide Squad’s Karate-Trained Breakout Star appeared first on Vogue.


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    For a first-time actress tasked with playing an aspiring disco star in Baz Luhrmann’s The Get Down, which premieres on Netflix this Friday, Herizen Guardiola is quick to call herself a tomboy. “Right now I’m wearing a Led Zeppelin T-shirt with jeans and Adidas, and a headband,” the 20-year-old tells me. “I’m kind of like the rocker side of the ’70s.” It’s true: If Instagram is any proof, the Miami native doesn’t exactly parade around in her character’s plunging nightclub-ready dresses, but she has a sense of unstudied, bohemian cool—coupled with free-spirited curls and incandescent skin. No doubt this was the X factor Luhrmann was looking for (along with camera-ready features and a voice that nailed Alicia Keys’s “Fallin’ ” in the audition) for his 12-episode project, which is set in the turbulent Bronx of the late 1970s. The series follows a group of ambitious teens finding their voice, whether through the beats and rhymes of nascent hip-hop or, in the case of Guardiola’s Mylene Cruz, the shimmering haze of disco. In anticipation of a weekend spent plowing through the first six episodes (the next half will soon follow), we caught up with Guardiola to talk about her immersion into an era of dance-floor divas, her unexpected love of glitter, and the restorative power of reggae festivals. To prepare for the role, did you give yourself a crash course in all things ’70s? Actually, the cast and I had what we called the dojo—the place where we trained for a month before we started filming: learning the moves, the wardrobes, what happened in the ’70s. Grandmaster Flash was around a lot, helping us learn how hip-hop was made, and I had a box of books and DVDs that Baz put together for all of us. I also did a lot of research on Donna Summer, to get to know what it was like to be a disco star, because I really didn’t have much of a clue! I wanted to put into perspective what that dream must have been like for my character, Mylene. What did you find most captivating about Donna Summer? I’m kind of a tomboy, so I had to learn how to be graceful and really girly. She’s majestic in the way she moves and glides across the stage, and she just has this sexiness about her that I had to cultivate. I watched her documentary and a lot of her videos on YouTube. “Love to Love You Baby” was one of the songs I would play in my trailer when I was getting ready to put on a big dance number. I listened to a lot of Cher and Diana Ross as well. Mylene comes from a strict, religious household, where disco’s glamour has no place. How does that compare to your childhood? The way I grew up, in a way, resonates with my character. I’m half Cuban and half Jamaican; my dad’s a reggae musician and he was raised Cuban Catholic, and my mom was raised Baptist, but she’s a Buddhist and a nutritionist and yoga instructor. When I was young, I would go from living with my hippie parents to my [extended] family’s house, and I would have to put on the pearls and put my hair in a bow and dress really nice. That helped me with my character. Did your parents have rules about makeup and hairstyles, or were they hands-off? Yeah, it used to be something my parents would argue about. I have two younger sisters, and my dad would always say, “The girls should grow their hair and get dreadlocks,” and my mom was like, “No, let them be who they want to be.” I’m glad that I have my crazy, curly hair. And natural hair has such a moment in the show. All the boys, except for Jaden [Smith], I think, have their hair just picked out. It’s a lot of beautiful, natural ’fros everywhere and Latina curls. I love it. I grew up with curly hair everywhere. My dad has dreads, my mom had dreads, and my sisters and I would wear our hair wild in the jungle of my backyard in Miami. Your character goes through a big beauty transformation, from being a pastor’s daughter to a disco queen. Did I hear that you wear a wig? Yeah, I was wearing a wig. They did a really good job with that. Mylene is pretty clean-faced—that’s just who she is. And once she goes disco, there’s a lot of really fun, beautiful makeup that I get to wear, like glamorous lashes. You have to watch to see exactly what it is—I don’t want to ruin anything! Your looks in the show are drawn from Halston and Diane von Furstenberg, with plunging V-necks and thigh-high slits. How did that feel? There’s a lot of skin in Miami! I mean, I’m Latina; I have it in me. I think I worked it. Sometimes it was uncomfortable, but for the most part, it was a lot of fun. What are your beauty essentials in real life? Burt’s Bees on my lips. I use a lot of sparkles: I just put glitter on my face, around my eyes, on my décolletage if it’s showing. I like looking really tan, and I wear a lot of blush—sometimes I use lipstick, honestly! You mentioned your mom is into wellness. Is that a big part of your life? I’m a vegetarian; I eat a lot of organic food. I do a lot of stretching and yoga, and I go on hikes—anywhere that is pretty. We go to Temescal a lot when we’re in California. I just came back from a reggae festival; it’s called Reggae on the River, and we were hiking all over the hills. I feel really healthy right now!   Save Save Save Save Save Save

    The post Meet Herizen Guardiola, the Fresh-Faced Disco Star of Baz Luhrmann’s The Get Down appeared first on Vogue.


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    Warmer temperatures have a way of kicking the olfactory sense into high gear—for better (sea air, barbecues) or for worse (garbage day in Manhattan). Right now, amid the on-and-off heat waves of a sultry summer, why not embrace the sensory overload and, more than that, add your own intoxicating sillage to the mix? When the air is thick and soupy, the conventional wisdom might be to look for the freshest, lightest fragrances: the perfume equivalent of a straight-from-the-cooler LaCroix. But there’s merit to wearing a headier scent, redolent of a sunbaked beach or earthy spices or musky florals. After all, how else will you stand out in the already ripe crowd?    

    The post Feeling the Heat? These 6 Sultry Scents Will Have You Embracing the Dog Days of Summer appeared first on Vogue.


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    Who can deny the sense of satisfaction that comes with ticking off a back-to-school shopping list? The cart is full—crisp notebooks, pens of just the right thinness, a handsome protractor in smoke gray plastic—and the possibilities are endless. It’s almost enough to distract you from the waning days of summer vacation. The trick, once the steadier rhythm of working life sets in, is to reclaim that fresh-start approach, and there’s no better place to begin than with your beauty routine. Here, you’ll find an updated take on the classic supplies, including a rainbow of colored eyeliners (perfect for multitasking à la Fendi or monochromatic cat-eyes), on-the-go makeup wipes (gym-class staples), and a sleek new water bottle by the sustainability-minded filter company, Soma. You’ll be sure to draw eyes in the cafeteria.  

    The post The Back-to-School Beauty Checklist: Here’s Exactly What to Buy appeared first on Vogue.


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    The athletic bodies catching the collective eye at the Olympics this month are as diverse as they come, with Simone Biles proving that explosive things come in small packages, and basketball’s Elena Delle Donne blending power and grace at 6-feet-5. Lately, those strolling along Copacabana in Rio have had yet another cause for a double take, given Izabel Goulart’s love for a beachfront workout. The Brazilian bombshell, who serves as her country’s ambassador for the Olympics, has a well-documented passion for fitness, as seen in the headstands and ab-blasting moves on her Instagram feed. “Sport has been part of my life since [I was] very young,” Goulart says. “Growing up, I was always the tallest girl in the class, so volleyball and basketball came naturally to me.” Now as a globe-trotting model dividing her time between Rio, Paris, and New York, she finds that activity is an anchor. “I have a personal goal to work out one hour daily, no matter how busy my schedule is. Exercise just brings me a lot of focus and dedication to my everyday life.” That dedication has been duly noted—by brands like Victoria’s Secret and Nike, not to mention the countless followers who have adopted her #BodyByIza hashtag as a personal mantra. Goulart credits the results to an ever-changing series of high-intensity workouts, which she’s happy to be testing out at home this month: “Copacabana Beach in Rio is the best place to run and exercise in all of Brazil. Just the energy in Copacabana makes you want to move.” And so, in this season of awe-inspiring feats of athleticism, Goulart shares with Vogue her go-to exercises on her go-to stretch of sand. May these four full-body moves put a touch of Brazilian magic (and some chiseled obliques) within reach.   Rotating Side Plank Take side plank on your forearm, with your feet planted one in front of the other. With your hips stabilized at the level of your shoulders, rotate your torso to face the mat while reaching your top arm underneath your stomach. Slowly unwind back to the starting position, keeping your core engaged. Note from Goulart: “One of my favorite exercises. We work out all the obliques, the side abs, and the core. When you do the movement with the arms back and forth, you need to be very balanced and stable.”   Twisted Core Plank Start in plank position, with your shoulders over your wrists and your hips at shoulder height. Draw the right knee toward the left shoulder, and place the foot back in starting position. Draw the left knee toward the right shoulder, and place the foot back. Repeat, alternating sides and wringing out the obliques while keeping the shoulders and core engaged. Note from Goulart: “Try to bring your knees up to your chest, so you get maximum range of movement.”     Hands-Free Power Burpee Starting with feet shoulder-width apart on the mat, bend into a squat and then jump straight up with arms lifted; land in a squat. Step back with the right foot, lowering the right knee to the ground; drop the left knee to the ground. Step up on the mat with the right foot, then step up with the left, finishing in a squat. Repeat, jumping up and lowering the left knee first; continue alternating sides, keeping the core engaged throughout. Note from Goulart: “It’s a really full-body exercise with some plyometrics.”   Resistance-Band Glutes and Thigh Blaster Tie or loop the resistance band around the lower calves, so there is tension when standing hip-width apart. Step sideways with the right foot to a shoulder-width and lower into a deep squat, keeping your knees over toes and your torso as upright as possible. Step the right foot back in to release the tension. Repeat on the other side, stepping out with the left. Note from Goulart: “Working out with the bands makes you use your full body. They’re very strong, very resistant, so the whole time you have to stay focused.”   Videographer: Cabelo / 8588 Studio

    The post Supermodel Izabel Goulart’s Brazilian Beach Workout in 4 Body-Sculpting GIFs appeared first on Vogue.


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    Louis Vuitton has a way of redefining timeless chic: Its coveted antique steamer trunks prove that luggage is anything but pedestrian, and Nicolas Ghesquière’s elbow-grazing leather gloves for fall give the classic opera length a cool punk-rock update. But the fashion house has been noticeably quiet on one front, fragrance, for nearly 90 years—though not for long. Next month, it will introduce seven extraordinary perfumes that walk the line between rarefied and wearable, with a lineup of carefully sourced ingredients (Florentine iris, Chinese magnolia oil) that echo the company’s globe-trotting history. Even the bottles, by the design star Marc Newson, are elementally on point: rounded glass bottles, pared-down stopper caps, neat black type. At a time when the notion of a full fragrance wardrobe—one for every mood and occasion—has largely supplanted a signature scent, it’s only fitting that the debut isn’t one hero product, but rather a gang of superheroines. “One can always consider that smells are genderless and everything is unisex,” Jacques Cavallier Belletrud, the master perfumer behind the scents, explains. “That said, I had a wonderful time imagining each of these creations on a woman’s skin.” When the collection hits Louis Vuitton boutiques on September 1, you’ll be able to do more than imagine. A test-drive of Turbulence, with its seductive hit of white florals, might transport you to Belletrud’s garden in Grasse at the height of August, when the jasmine bushes and tuberose are in full flower. Another jewel of the French fragrance capital—rose de mai—mingles with varieties from Turkey and Bulgaria in Rose des Vents. Contre Moi, laced with Tahitian vanilla, steers toward the tropics; the sensuality of skin reigns in Dans La Peau, a blend of leather notes, musks, and jasmine sambac. Mille Feux also draws on the house’s iconic leather, this time with raspberry and the osmanthus flower. And Matière Noir skews intriguingly dark (spiked with Laotian agarwood), while Apogée conveys a lightness of being, with lily of the valley as its muse. Whatever voyage you choose, it’s time to get packing. Les Parfums launches September 1 at select Louis Vuitton boutiques; $240 for a 100ml bottle, and $350 for 200ml.  

    The post Louis Vuitton’s 7 Devastatingly Chic Perfumes Will Send You to Fragrance Heaven appeared first on Vogue.


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    When a new season sparks a desire for change, there’s an impulse to let the scissors do the talking (Jean Seberg pixie, anyone?). But a fall reboot can be just as effective with subtler means of transformation. Consider the brows: Tinted this way or that, those twin punctuation marks can suddenly bring a certain je ne sais quoi to the face. “I really like it when people can’t figure out what’s been done, but everyone’s like, ‘You look so good! Awake, alive, refreshed,’ ” Carrie Lindsey tells me at her brow-and-facial studio in Brooklyn’s Fort Greene neighborhood, the sort of place where both sunlight and chic regulars stream in all day. While the runways traffic in the avant-garde—futuristic bleached eyebrows at Givenchy’s Fall show, highlighter pink brows for Maison Margiela’s couture collection—Lindsey lets nature be her guide. “Typically when I tint, I look at the root color of your hair; that tells me if you’re warm or cool,” she explains of her custom-blended colors. (After testing dyes over the past two decades, she favors the gentle vegetable-based ones formulated with just a hint of peroxide, to aid in the depositing of pigment without any bleaching effect.) That keen eye for observation means she embraces the seasonal shifts. “In the summer I love that sun-kissed, beachy look, when the brows get a little lighter. Then I pull the brow back out in the fall,” she says of her tendency to go darker with the onset of cooler temperatures. How is it that a subtle wash of color can make such a difference? Because, with brows, there’s often more than meets the eye. “The tint adds color to all hair that it touches, even the new growth and blonde facial fuzz we all have, making a noticeably richer and more ‘filled-in’ look,” says Kristie Streicher, who sculpts her trademarked Feathered Brow at her Beverly Hills salon, Striiike. For those experimenting with statement hair color—such as platinum, candy pink, or dove gray—Streicher welcomes a bold brow that reads “edgy and cool.” On the flipside, softening the brow color with a high-lift tint can temper an otherwise harsh look, she points out. “However, proceed with caution,” she stresses, “as the hair on the brow is not as strong and forgiving as the hair on the head. Overbleaching, -coloring and -shaping can really affect future growth.” Back in Brooklyn, I’m perched in a high stool while Lindsey mixes a tailor-made shade of brown. “I’m going to lean toward ash on you because you have cool undertones,” she tells me, before she swipes rainbows of color atop both brows. Minutes later, she wipes off the dye and stands back to assess. “It’s super pretty—subtle,” she says. “It’s just the perfect emphasis.” She’s right. It wasn’t enough to catch a friend’s notice over wine that night, but the next morning at work my editor stopped herself mid-sentence to say, “Wow—your brows look great.” For a makeup minimalist, what more can you ask for? Carrie Lindsey Beauty, 88 S. Portland Avenue, Brooklyn, carrielindseybeauty.com Striiike, 9278 Civic Center Drive, Beverly Hills, striiike.com

    The post This Tiny Tweak Is the Shakeup Your Fall Beauty Routine Needs appeared first on Vogue.


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    The hushed appeal of high-stakes tennis, on display at the U.S. Open starting next week, reverberates far beyond the court’s crisp white lines and deep into living rooms, where HD televisions transmit every furrowed brow, every sigh of relief—and every flash of cherry-red nail polish. Sure, to some, the notion of an on-court beauty regimen might seem at odds with the pursuit of raw athleticism. But in an age where self-presentation is itself a nonstop sport, it’s hardly a surprise that the tennis greats swear by a handful of essentials that not only wick away sweat and protect against sun damage, but also, say, perk up lashes. After all, with pro apparel taking an increasingly fashion-forward bent, those court-tested beauty products are just another part of a work-appropriate wardrobe—albeit one for a particularly hard-hitting career. Here, five celebrated players, all fresh off the Rio Olympics and bound for New York’s Arthur Ashe Stadium, share their on-court favorites. Serena Williams The powerhouse American (and 2012 and 2015 Vogue cover star) ranks number one in women’s tennis. Her picks: OPI nail polish in Pink-ing of You and Big Apple Red, along with Milani black eyeliner and Cover Girl waterproof mascara. “Playing tennis is hard because you sweat and move so much,” Williams says, “and this eyeliner and mascara don’t!”   Mónica Puig At this year’s Olympics, she became the first woman to win a gold medal for Puerto Rico. Her picks: On-theme nail art (as Puig sported in Rio—“It brought me good luck!”), along with a rotating lineup of Ellesse headbands. “I play with [one of these] at all times. It feels so comfortable and keeps my hair in place, and I also think it looks good on top of that!” she says.   Madison Keys She’s the first American player to crack the women’s top 10 rankings since Serena Williams did it in 1999. Her pick: Neutrogena oil-free sunscreen. “I use SPF 50 to keep my face protected from sun damage,” says Keys. “I like this product because it feels weightless on my skin and stays put even when I am sweating.”   Petra Kvitova The Czech native took home the bronze medal in Rio this summer. Her picks: Essie nail polish in a bright shade that matches the day’s Nike ensemble, along with La Roche-Posay sunscreen. “I never go without it,” she says. “We spend all year playing under the bright sun, so it’s really important to protect my face with a great product that stays in place.”   Kristina Mladenovic The French player won the doubles tournament alongside Caroline Garcia at this year’s French Open. Her picks: A sturdy ponytail or braid (“Comfortable to play with”) and Avène Hydrance, a lightweight cream. “I hardly wear any makeup on court—maybe a little mascara from Chanel from time to time,” she says.    

    The post Serena Williams, Mónica Puig, and More Tennis Stars Share The Winning Beauty Staples They Can’t Live Without appeared first on Vogue.


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    For tourists accustomed to the concrete people-movers known as Manhattan sidewalks, a trip to San Francisco can have an invigorating effect. Ski-slope hills turn a Philz Coffee run into a hamstring-blasting workout, with panoramic views as a reward. Then there are the fog-clad mornings that melt into afternoon sun, luring the masses to Dolores Park. You can find small-batch skin care at a growing number of smartly curated boutiques, and a world of hikes, beaches, and campsites lies just outside—and often within—the Bay Area’s limits.  All the more reason to let a local guide the way. For that, we called upon Courtney Klein, the founder of Storq, a line of versatile, modern maternity wear, who lives in the Mission with her husband, Zach, and their two young children. For the tech-minded couple (Zach runs DIY, an imaginative, skills-focused online hub for kids), that balance of urban life and outdoor escape is key. During a decade-long stretch in New York City, the Kleins came across a parcel of wooded land upstate where, together with friends, they helped foster a build-it-yourself community of cabins and treehouses called Beaver Brook—an endeavor that sparked an Instagram of dreamy reference images (@cabinporn), a book of the same name, and the couple’s eventual move West. Given her split-screen love of city living and the outdoors, Courtney’s beauty guide to the Bay Area features the best of both worlds, including the neighborhood salon that gave her goddess-like platinum tresses in the midst of her second pregnancy (a controversial move, she notes, though her ob-gyn gave the thumbs-up). “It was a real self-esteem boost,” she says. “Everyone was like, ‘You’re Khaleesi!’ ” Here, Klein’s list of the best beauty, health, and fitness destinations in and around her adopted city. Population Salon, where Courtney went platinum: “They’re amazing. I go every six to eight weeks. I’ve been joking that I’ve saved all the money over the last ten years, trimming my hair at home and not dyeing it. I went to get a touch up three days before my son was born. I wasn’t sure I was going to make it!” Fort Funston: “It’s the world’s most beautiful dog park. You have to take a hundred or so steps down to the beach, and my daughter and I practice counting down every step. But trying to make it up those stairs while pregnant, it was like my husband had to stand behind me and push me up! We spend a lot of time there, just having the dog run around, the kid run around. It’s the perfect place to get out everybody’s energy.” International Orange for massages: “They are great, and they have a beautiful little sunroom. I let myself be pampered during pregnancy in a way that, in my regular life, I’m like, ‘No.’ During pregnancy, I think, ‘I need a massage every month!’ ” Kristina Holey: “She’s an amazing facialist, although I haven’t been to see her yet—it’s at the top of my to-do list! A friend of mine who is a hairstylist in New York was like, ‘Kristina Holey is moving to the Bay Area. You have to get on this.’ Someday—that’s a definite.” Marin Headlands: “We have a Thanksgiving tradition with our family where we make leftover turkey sandwiches, pack them in a backpack, and hike the Miwok Trail, which overlooks the whole bay. Then we’ll cut over to the coastal trail and hike down to Rodeo Beach; coincidentally during the Vietnam War my dad was stationed there, so it’s always a fun bit of history to chat about San Francisco in the ’60s.” Aesop, Veer & Wander, and General Store: “Aesop you know; Veer & Wander carries a lot of natural makeup and natural brands. And General Store, I really love their assortment of beauty stuff, and it’s a beautiful place. Serena, who runs the store, does a really great job.” Rainbow Grocery Cooperative: “This place was like a revelation when I moved here from New York. It’s a vegetarian grocery store, but the thing that’s crazy is they have an amazing bulk section for normal things, as well as beauty. You can go and get a giant bottle of conditioner and put it in a pretty bottle at your house. I sometimes stock up there.” Kirby Cove Camp: “This campground is pretty competitive to rent, but a friend introduced me to this brilliant idea where she immediately goes for weekdays. The first time we went, we pitched a tent, had our dinner there, hung out all night, and then the next morning it’s only a ten-minute commute into the city. You’re almost literally under the Golden Gate Bridge, sleeping in the wilderness right next to this beautiful private beach. It’s such a juxtaposition.” Earth Tu Face and Fat and the Moon: “What I love about Earth Tu Face is they’re a natural beauty brand, but they’re not earthy. They have this stick that you can put on everything. On the flipside, another brand that I really love is Fat and the Moon. We used to carry her stuff at Storq when we were doing more beauty. Her deodorant is amazing. It’s the only natural one I’ve ever found that just works.” Jane Austin at the Yoga Tree: “I majored in dance in college, and once I stopped dancing I needed something that would activate my body in a similar way. Yoga has always been that for me. In San Francisco when you’re pregnant, everyone makes a pilgrimage to Jane Austin at the Yoga Tree, on Valencia. She’s like a cult celebrity. The first time I walked in, there were 35 pregnant ladies in one room, and I was like, ‘Nope, this isn’t for me’—but then you end up getting sucked in. I went three days a week during my first pregnancy. Pass it on!”  

    The post The Bay Area’s Best Hidden Beauty Discoveries, From Panoramic Hikes to Natural Skin Salves appeared first on Vogue.


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    Who isn’t a woman on the go these days? No matter if you are mother, student, hustling freelancer, or presidential candidate, the day often unfolds from one thing to the next with time for little more than a pit stop refresh—which is why we did a double take backstage this morning at Jason Wu, where a pair of scaled-back, universally flattering makeup looks offered twin roadmaps for a new day-to-night beauty strategy. The first—an understated taupe eye, set against dewy skin—called for some creative liberties with Maybelline’s Brow Drama Pomade Crayon, which makeup artist Yadim melted into the upper lids and under the lower lashes before rimming the waterlines in pale beige pencil and applying highlighter at the inner corners. “It’s a good hangover look!” model Tilda Lindstam joked, her subtly smudged eyes flashing. “I just imagine summer: hot nights with a cool, greasy [lid],” said Yadim of the muted sultriness. Given the uptick in temperature in New York over the last couple of days, it’s not exactly a stretch of the imagination—although with its fresh-faced sheen, it was just as easy to imagine as a new, anything-but-boring, office staple. If making a beeline from your desk to drinks is the plan once the clock strikes 6:00 p.m., Wu has another solution worth offering in the form of a fluorescent-red lip on an otherwise bare face. Backstage, Yadim created a base coat using a blend of two matte formulas (Maybelline’s Color Sensational Liquid Lip Color in Orange Shot and a lipstick in Orange Danger) and, in the final minutes before the show, dabbed electric theatrical makeup at the center of the mouth for a traffic-stopping punch. Julie Hoomans gave her thumbs up, saying, “A red lip elevates a whole look; it makes it instantly cool.” It’s also the closest thing to a magic makeup bullet that will fit in your clutch this fall.  

    The post Are You Feeling Fresh Skin or a Fluoro-Pop Lip? Here’s Why You Need Both for Fall appeared first on Vogue.


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    I am dressed as if for a funeral, or for New York: black, calf-grazing Yohji Yamamoto dress, white Jil Sander lace-ups. As I make my way to the Ace Hotel in Manhattan earlier this week, thoughts of death float through my mind like a beach ball in a crowded stadium—more free association than doom and gloom—and for good reason. I’m about to try on the last thing one might ever wear: a two-piece burial ensemble embedded with mushrooms. If you’re one of the 1.3 million viewers who has watched Jae Rhim Lee’s 2011 TED Talk on her innovative death suit, you know where this is going. Lee, an indefatigably curious, MIT-educated artist and entrepreneur, stepped onto that stage in an early prototype (black sturdy fabric, with white dendritic embroidery) and shared her proposal to disrupt the funeral business. There are some 200 environmental toxins coursing through the average body, she explained, citing the Centers for Disease Control; cremation releases them into the atmosphere, while traditional burial employs carcinogenic formaldehyde and other chemicals for preservation. She presented her ecologically sound alternative—those mushrooms—but pre-emptively gave voice to squeamish dissenters: “We want to eat, not to be eaten, by our food, right?” Five years later, with farm-to-table a well-worn buzzword and household composting hitting the mainstream, we just might be ready to consider, shall we say, a table-to-farm approach, where those hardworking organisms—which release enzymes to quell toxins or aid in binding heavy metals, along with being master decomposers—quietly return us to the earth. This spring, Lee’s company, Coeio (the name riffs on a Latin word meaning “assemble, or come together”), officially launched the Infinity Burial Suit to the public, and this month the Ace is hosting an exhibition in honor of New York Fashion Week. To be sure, it’s an unconventional entry into a designer-driven lineup, including Tom Ford’s glittering presentation on Wednesday at the dearly departed Four Seasons Restaurant. But when we spend so much time, so much money, determining what to wear for milestone life events—the one-day-only wedding dress comes to mind—why is it that we often overlook the final and most enduring among them? Subject avoidance is one reason. “Death is the last frontier; it’s the last taboo of the environmental movement,” explains Lee, who found the convergence of art and fashion to be a means of provocation. In that arena, she tells me, “There’s just more openness and acceptance, more, ‘Hey, I get why you’re doing this because you’re trying to create dialogue.’ ” Lee has done just that: The buzz around Coeio is growing, with next-level fund-raising on the horizon. She envisions building out a range of styles with future designer collaborations, but the version I slip off the hanger at the Ace is surprisingly like her TED Talk prototype: The white stitching echoes the original rootlike motif, while the optimized design by Daniel Silverstein features streamlined flaps and side-seam buttons for easier fastening. (The wearer typically isn’t wriggling into the pants and jacket, as I am.) Lee, who goes by JR, peels back the face flap like a beret and steps back, exclaiming, “It’s amazing! This actually fits you really well, the sleeve length and everything.” And, indeed, I’m oddly at home in the suit, comfortable in the nostalgia-inducing way that it calls to mind footed pajamas and woolen mittens. (Perhaps the end of life is like a return to childhood.) I feel a beanbag-like clump in my left hand. “Wildflower seeds,” says Lee, “and there’s a kind of mushroom that delivers nutrients to plant roots.” Later that evening, I return to the Ace lobby to see the burial suit animated, as it were, during the first-ever public demonstration. A crowd of spectators, hotel guests, and taxidermy animals looks on as Lee—accessorized with a white coat, white high-tops, and red lipstick—solemnly fastens the suit around a prone performer. A few feet away, the Sora Quartet plays excerpts from John Cage’s String Quartet in Four Parts (once the president of the New York Mycological Society, he might have approved of the Infinity Burial Project); the loud tinkling of wineglasses seems Cageian as well. As the performer, suit buttoned and face obscured, is guided toward the exit, I catch part of a recording of the composer’s voice: “If anybody is sleepy, let him go to sleep.”  

    The post Would You Wear a Mushroom-Powered Burial Suit? A Vogue Writer Takes the Plunge appeared first on Vogue.


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    Backstage at Victoria Beckham this morning, a tightly choreographed troupe of models, photographers, and crew threaded through the narrow corridors of the Cunard Building near Wall Street, careful to steer clear of the flat irons in hairstylists’ hands. That’s right: At a time when natural texture reigns supreme, with all manner of coils, kinks, and air-dried waves on the runway and streets, that once-prized hot tool is back in action. The pin-straight heads of hair in the meticulous care of Guido Palau and his team read like a real-world hyperlink to the early aughts, though here, as Palau cheekily put it, the effect was “high-maintenance simplicity.” So very Victoria Beckham, whose understated, head-to-toe polish has accompanied her rise into the fashion stratosphere. As for achieving that gleam of perfection, Palau stressed the importance of a well-chosen arsenal: an efficient blow-dryer paired with a heat-protectant primer (he likes Redken’s Pillow Proof), along with a powerful, lightweight flat iron (GHD’s Platinum Styler—“super-beautiful-looking as well as doing a great job,” said Palau, though he might as well have been talking about Beckham). Clean center parts kept the focus on those “very minimal, very chic” lengths—and on the designer’s crushed-velvet separates in petal-color pastels. Things loosened up north of the neck, where makeup legend Pat McGrath opted for an “abstract, freeform use of color,” finger-painting peacock-blue streaks across the lids of a half-dozen models and drawing a crisp green cat-eye on a few more; still others bore just a whisper of nude eyeshadows to enhance the natural contours. The trio of looks—veering from weekday-staple to party-central—fit right into the show-now-buy-now ethos of this season’s collections: McGrath pulled those eyeshadows straight from Beckham’s much-anticipated cosmetics collection for Estée Lauder, which debuts on Bergdorf Goodman’s website this Tuesday. Victoria Beckham Spring 2017 Ready-to-Wear:

    The post How to Work a Flat Iron Like Victoria Beckham—Lessons in Straight Hair From the Designer’s Show appeared first on Vogue.


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    One look at Chloë Grace Moretz—dressed in navy sailor pants and a lace-trimmed plaid blouse that marries Western panache and ladylike polish—and it’s clear why Coach creative director Stuart Vevers tapped her as the face of the fashion house two years ago. The Los Angeles–based actress exudes a sense of unfettered confidence that pegs her beyond a precocious 19, which makes her a fitting ambassador for the brand’s elevated romp through youth culture. As Vevers once put it, “The French have chic; Americans have cool,” and now Moretz is lending her down-to-earth star power to another pillar of the 75-year-old company: a new perfume launching this month. “The work I’ve done at Coach, it’s not about being weighted down by old codes of luxury; it’s about looking at what the next generation cares about,” explains Vevers. “I think Chloë represents that in many ways—this idea of freedom and ease.” It might be Moretz’s first time fronting a fragrance—the campaign, photographed by Steven Meisel, captures her on a road trip at magic hour—but her passion for beauty is a long time in the making. “My brother, Trevor, started me on under-eye cream at 10 years old!” the actress recalls with a laugh. “It was La Mer, of course. Ever since then I have been obsessed with skin care.” Now, she’s as quick to gush about her holistic facialist (“RPK, at Dr. Lancer’s office—she’s my girl”) or her go-to colorist (Lorri Goddard) as she is to defend her hands-off approach to brows. Here, Moretz chats with Vogue.com about her fearless philosophy when it comes to fragrance cocktailing, her love of drugstore makeup, and her unusual choice of face wash. What is your personal approach to perfume—are you a fragrance faithful? No! I jump around a lot. Fragrance has been a really big deal in my life for years. My mom wore Gucci Rush all the time. Samsara [by Guerlain] is my grandmother’s smell. And [Viktor & Rolf’s] Flowerbomb was my first real scent. At 16, I went to Byredo and did Gypsy Water and later Bal d’Afrique. Then I moved to Le Labo, with Santal [33] and Thé Noir [29]. Even now, I mix different scents using essential oils. Do you custom-blend notes with the Coach fragrance, too? Yeah! This one mixes really well because it has undertones of musk and sandalwood, but also the raspberry leaf and Turkish rose give you a springtime flavor. It really feels like the modern-day young woman. There’s a leather kind of feel as well as this fruity femininity, which I think is actually a revelation right now. We are all learning to be powerful CEOs, but we don’t have to be aggressive and hard just to be successful. Are you as invested in your skin care? I am so obsessed. My friends always come to me for beauty tips in terms of healthy skin. I use like 12 different creams! Any highlights? It’s a long list! First, I wash my skin with olive oil—straight-up olive oil. You rub it on your face until it all comes off clear. Next come the sensitive polish and the sensitive wash by Dr. Lancer. I use these Babor yellow gold essential oils, which are a dream. And Lucas’ Papaw ointment is my go-to. I cover my lips in it, and then I put it underneath my eyes. Hydration is key. What about sunscreen, given your upbringing in California? That was a huge thing growing up. I used to fight my brother so hard! L.A. is such a warm-weather culture, it’s hard to not be tan. Now I get why I wore sunscreen, and I am very happy with my skin. What are your day-to-day makeup essentials? Pat McGrath’s glow stick is amazing. I’m completely obsessed. I don’t wear any makeup anymore when I’m not working—just that little bit of shimmer. And then Chantecaille cover stick, underneath the eyes and in the nasiolabial fold. An eyebrow brush and eyebrow gel, too. That’s all you need. And for a night out? My go-to is a good smoky eye with a nude pink-y lip. Sometimes I’ll do a red lip, but you know I’m having a really wild night! I honestly use some of the cheapest stuff. I like Revlon color palettes, or L’Oreal. It works! Where does fitness fit in for you? Obviously it’s a part of my job. I enjoy being fit, but for me it’s a mental obsession. When I don’t work out, I just am literally not as happy as when I work out. I love the endorphin rush. It’s my time to myself. What is in your repertoire? SoulCycle for solid cardio, and then Y7, which is like hot Bikram yoga but it’s vinyasa. I like it because they play Biggie and Tupac, so it’s fun and more upbeat. And I have this Pilates instructor, Kim Carruthers, who is a total badass. She’s dope. Is being comfortable in your own skin something that comes naturally to you as an actress? I’m thinking of the bikini scenes in Neighbors 2. Well, I grew up in front of the camera—I’ve been acting since I was 6 years old—so I’ve never had a real issue with it. But it definitely is different when you are doing something like comedy, where you’re opening yourself up and you know it’s going to be seen by millions of people. You really just have to give in because it’s wild anyway. Do you have any beauty vices? Healthy eating is a big one. People don’t understand how much it actually does affect your skin. Like, I had pizza last night, and I know for a fact I am going to break out tomorrow! I hope it was worth it! Where did you go? Emmett’s Pizza! Everyone, go there—run! It’s on Macdougal and Houston [in New York City]. You have to get the Peggy O and the Hot Papi, on the thin crust. That’s my favorite. It will blow your mind.  

    The post Chloë Grace Moretz—The New Face of Coach Fragrance—Reveals the Secrets of Her Beauty Routine appeared first on Vogue.


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    Margot Robbie has a way of catching you off-guard. When the actress splashed onto the scene in The Wolf of Wall Street in 2013, the awestruck masses had to reconcile the fact that this brazen blonde with a spot-on Brooklyn accent hailed, in fact, from Australia. Since then, the 26-year-old has become known for breaking the screen-star mold. For one, she takes on as much work on-camera (The Legend of Tarzan and Suicide Squad this summer alone) as off, co-running a production company with a slate of upcoming projects, including Terminal, a thriller, and a Tonya Harding biopic. (Robbie, with a reputation for fearlessly doing much of her own stunt work, already has experience in skates, having played on an amateur ice hockey team a few years back in New York.) She also straddles the worlds of polish and rogue whimsy, seeming as comfortable exuding Grace Kelly–esque glamour on the red carpet as she is inking fellow cast members on-the-fly with her tattoo gun. With her latest role as the face of Calvin Klein’s Deep Euphoria fragrance campaign, she also brings a layered perspective—as a woman who embodies both sensuality and free-spirited power, and as an actress for whom perfume is a very real tool for character work. Here, she speaks with Vogue.com about the scents that have accompanied her on set, her early days as part of a tribe of all-girl surfers, and her beauty favorites, from her go-to trainer in Los Angeles to a bucolic spa outside of London. You’re calling from London. Is that still where you call home? Yeah, I’m shooting a movie here at the moment, so it’s nice to stay put for a minute. It’s about A.A. Milne, the author of the Winnie-the-Pooh series, and I play his wife, Daphne. It’s a beautiful, beautiful film. I’m really enjoying it. Calvin Klein has such a history with epoch-defining campaigns and fragrances. What were your earliest memories of the brand? My earliest memories were the black-and-white photos of Kate Moss and Mark Wahlberg. I just thought it was so cool. Calvin Klein kind of made the ’90s; they have a way of making classic things seem modern. And a lot of women in my family have worn Calvin Klein [perfumes], so it’s a scent that’s been dotted throughout my childhood. What scents take you back to your childhood in Australia? Are there iconic perfumes you wore, or was it more about the beach and sunscreen and eucalyptus? The smell of the beach and the smell of the thunderstorm—all those kinds of things definitely make me feel at home. At my house growing up, we had lavender bushes and jasmine; I can smell a bit of jasmine and rose in this perfume, so, yeah, they’re the sort of scents that take me back to my childhood. When I was a little girl, I remember every time I’d hug my auntie or my mom, they had a certain scent. I remember thinking, “I can’t wait until I’m old enough to wear perfume, and I’ll have my scent, too.” How does perfume fold into your daily life, on-camera or off? I know some actors incorporate scent into their character work. I actually do—I always pick a perfume for each character I play. I try to keep it specific to that character, and only when I walk on set do I wear it. I find it extremely helpful. For the character I’m playing right now [Daphne Milne]—it’s set in the 1920s and 1930s—I found this beautiful perfume; it’s a more obscure one, not a well-known brand, but the bottle looks like it’s from the era. I asked about the scent, and the guy was like, “It smells like Greta Garbo, just swanning her way through a hotel in the 1920s.” And I was like, “That’s exactly what I’m after!” For Tarzan, when I played Jane, I wore pure rose oil because it felt delicate and earthy to suit the character. And when I played Harley [Quinn, in Suicide Squad], I picked something kind of tacky and sickly sweet, just a bit overbearing and in your face; I bought it from a strip mall in America. In the film I did before this one, Terminal, I was playing a femme fatale, this kind of dangerous, quirky, complicated woman, and as we did the shoot for the [Deep Euphoria] campaign, I was like, “Wow, this perfume is perfect for that.” So it ended up being my scent for that character. I hear you were a total water baby growing up. Did you have a favorite beach or surf haunt? Yeah, I did. I used to live in Currumbin Valley, which is up in the mountains, but if you go directly toward the coast you hit a surf spot called the Alley. It’s protected, so the waves are always calm and nice. We used to go every weekend and surf. It was about the time that Blue Crush came out, and that was our biggest inspiration of those years. We’d be there at the Alley every weekend, wanting to be these badass chick surfers. It was an all-girl gang. Did that upbringing help lay the groundwork for your fearlessness with stunts? Probably. Where I grew up in Australia, it’s super-outdoorsy. You’re always jumping off cliffs and riding motorbikes and doing that kind of stuff, so the stunt work is extremely fun for me. As an adopted Londoner, what are your go-to beauty and health spots in the city? Despite the fact that I’ve been here for over two years now, I’m not so up with that sort of stuff. I usually just ask my girlfriends; Cara [Delevingne] and Suki [Waterhouse] are my little black books! I recently went out to Soho Farmhouse, which is about an hour and a half outside of London, and it’s literally the most relaxing place on earth. They’ve got the Cowshed Spa out there; it was amazing. And there’s this brand, 111Skin. I recently got a facial there, and their products are incredible. My makeup artist turned me on to them. Has London, with its signature dreary rain, imparted any beauty lessons? It’s actually been really good for my skin to be living here. The sun is just so harsh in Australia, especially since we don’t really have the ozone layer that you get elsewhere, and I’ve noticed that my skin has totally changed. At this age—I’m 26 now—sun damage is becoming so evident, and as you start worrying about getting wrinkles and sunspots, I’m really grateful I’m on the other side of the world. L.A. is in your future, yes? What are you most looking forward to? Yeah, we’ll make the move later in the year. I see Andie Hecker—she is an amazing trainer. I love being able to see her in L.A., although in London there’s another amazing trainer, David Higgins. He’s an Aussie, too; he does Pilates, personal training. That’s my go-to form of exercise. In L.A. it’s so easy to eat healthy and be healthy, and there are all these bizarre methods of looking your best, which sometimes is helpful when you’re trying to get in shape; it’s also kind of nice to be removed from that sometimes. I’m looking forward to L.A.—it’s a much shorter flight to get home! What about your tattoo prowess? Is the hobby still going strong, and have you been leaving your mark on anyone interesting lately? I don’t know about prowess! It’s kind of like a party trick more than an actual skill. I ran out of tattoo supplies for a while, so I stopped for a little bit—which is probably the safer thing because I think we were getting a bit carried away! People forget that it’s going to be stuck on them forever, and they really do prove to be very open to the idea, which is kind of funny. I just topped up my supplies, so I’m ready to leave my mark on some new victims, I suppose [laughs]. But I do try to explain to people that I’m not actually a tattoo artist, so think long and hard!  

    The post Margot Robbie Belonged to a Surfer Girl Gang—And More Confessions From the Aussie Bombshell appeared first on Vogue.


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    Rebooting your hair regimen for a new season can be a whisper or a shout—look no further than the traffic-stopping dye jobs (neon orange, cotton-candy pink) stirring up a street-style frenzy. But sometimes a deft swap—be it a handsome scalp-focused shampoo or a supercharged (and super-quiet) hair dryer—can be just as revelatory on a personal level. Here is a lineup of fall launches to put on your radar, from a transformative new range for curls to a texturizing product designed for the shower, plus a cult brush that’s easy on the eyes and your strands. The Next-Level Natural Hair Line Who can keep their eyes off Lupita Nyong’o these days? The October Vogue cover star has left an incandescent streak on the red carpet and beyond, thanks in part to her British-born hairstylist Vernon François. This month, he has bottled up his curly-hair wisdom and launched a self-titled 13-piece range on Net-a-Porter. Aiming to address a wide mix of hair types—including tightly coiled spirals, loose waves, braids, and dreadlocks—he brings smart formulations and serious chic to the category.     The Must-Have Tool It’s not often that familiar appliances (fans, vacuums) are reimagined and reborn as cult objects, but leave it to James Dyson to extend his outside-the-box vision to the hair dryer. With 100-plus patents pending, the sleek device upends just about everything you’ve come to expect (loud whirring, bicep-straining weight, the occasional singed strand). Its suped-up, targeted airflow can be adjusted with three magnetic attachments, which stay cool to the touch thanks to built-in Heat Shield technology.     The Chic Scalp-Friendly Shampoo Concerns of the scalp—namely the itchy, flaking phenomenon known as dandruff—aren’t usually discussed in the same breath as, say, the latest destination salon in Paris, but then again Christophe Robin has a way of surprising you. This season, the sought-after colorist (Catherine Deneuve, Léa Seydoux, and Tilda Swinton are among his loyal fans) adds a new targeted shampoo to his cult-favorite line. Formulated with jujube bark extract, which calms inflammation and balances sebum production, the cleanser cuts down on dandruff and is gentle enough for daily use—plus, it looks great in the shower.     The Weightless Frizz-Fighting Spray The beauty world’s love of all things oil hasn’t gone unnoticed, but when it comes to hair products, what can be supremely nourishing can also sometimes weigh down finer textures. Which is why Bumble and Bumble’s Dry Oil Finishing Spray has a counterintuitive ring: Fortified with a blend of six oils (coconut, argan, and macadamia nut among them), the formula delivers a hit of shine and tames flyaways while remaining light as air. With strands on the mend from summer’s beach days, and with radiators soon to crank on, this mist promises to have far reach.   The Root Touch-Up Tweak As a colorist with a burnished client list (Beyoncé, Jennifer Lopez), Rita Hazan takes pride in nailing spot-on color, which usually entails a well-timed series of appointments. But for in-between moments, Hazan has a backup plan. Next month, she launches her Root Concealer Touch-up Stick, which cleverly borrows the easy-to-use format of a crayon-like chubby lipstick. It comes in three shades (ranging from dark blonde to black) and glides smoothly along the hairline, roots, and brows, delivering buildable color exactly where needed.   The Cult Brush It seems almost absurd to speak of a comb as a status object, but somehow hairstylist Yves Durif managed to build a loyal following (full disclosure: this writer is among them) with his wide-tooth, ivory-hued resin objet. Now, he has a handsome brush to match. Crafted without glue (green-lighting it for heat-styling), it features smooth bristles that glide easily through hair, and helps stimulate circulation throughout the scalp. That it looks like it came off an Italian screen star’s vanity is an added bonus.   The Damage Defense System Now that we’ve finally gotten the message about sun damage, the next point of concern is the unseen aggressors, from city pollution and dust to hard water. Shu Uemura’s new Urban Moisture line, launching this month, tackles that multi-pronged issue head-on, with four hair-care products—shampoo, conditioner, mask, and serum—designed to revive overtaxed strands. The three hero ingredients at the base of the formulas include vitamin-rich moringa (said to aid in capturing pollutants), antioxidant-powered red micro-algae, and a nourishing polymer blend. Cocktailed together, it just might be the suit of armor you need before hitting the sidewalk again.     The In-Shower Texturizing Treatment If mornings are all about shoehorning everything in (for some, a workout and an energizing smoothie; for others, extra shut-eye and a mad-dash out the door), cutting down on your hair routine is one way to shave off precious minutes. With R+Co’s Cactus Texturizing Shampoo, the styling happens before you’ve even turned off the shower. The idea here: When beachy texture is built into the wash cycle, easy-going waves—and low-to-no-fuss intervention—follow. The product features diatomaceous earth, which adds grip while acting like a sponge for excess oil; it also feeds the scalp with vitamin-rich sunflower seed extract. Air-drying just got better.    

    The post 8 Breakthrough Products That Will Overhaul Your Hair Game This Season appeared first on Vogue.


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    Meditation. We’ve read the studies, heard the testimonials, downloaded the apps, and studied the serene, incandescent faces of its devoted practitioners. But for those of us married to keyboards and smartphones, slipping into that mind-clearing state is easier said than done. Which is why a first foray into the world of sound bathing resonates all the more. Awash in the sonic landscapes of gongs, singing bowls, and tinkling chimes—at Maha Rose North, a retreat center in the Catskills, say, or the Brooklyn home of sound therapist Nate Martinez—you just might find the experience to be akin to a meditative shortcut or a blissed-out high. Fortunately, the practice is gaining momentum in wellness circles, with sessions popping up at yoga studios and chic spas around the globe. Here, a list of sound-therapy destinations where you can tune in and chill out. The Standard Spa, Miami Beach South Beach’s pulsing beat takes a restorative turn inside the hotel’s serene, Nordic-style spa, where singing crystal bowls accompany a massage for a deeper sense of mind-body balance. Upcoming events include a floating full-moon meditation, complete with underwater sonic vibrations by local practitioner Sadhu Singh, as well as an evening kundalini-and-gong workshop featuring yoga poses, breath work, and a head-clearing soundtrack. Sky Ting Yoga, New York City When owners Chloe Kernaghan and Krissy Jones are not cranking out their own freewheeling playlists during asana practice, the downtown New York destination plays host to Nate Martinez, a gifted practitioner who leads monthly sound baths in the skylit studio. Expect a shimmering, multilayered blend of tuning forks, vocal overtones, singing bowls, and more. Integratron, Landers, California This white-domed resonant chamber, dating to the 1950s and located in a dusty stretch of the Mojave Desert, is a pilgrimage site for sound meditation. Private sessions with crystal singing bowls can be booked in advance (count on the experience being transporting—if not exactly to outer space, which founder George Van Tassel cited as the inspiration behind the place); visiting practitioners also hold events and retreats. Maha Rose, Brooklyn A hub for alternative healing in Brooklyn’s Greenpoint neighborhood, Maha Rose offers a rotating mix of sound-healing experiences (workshops also take place at its Catskills-based sister retreat space, Maha Rose North). The lineup ahead includes sundown sessions with Katie Down of Mindful Music Psychotherapy, a workshop focused on singing crystal pyramids, and a breath work–focused sound bath led by the Brooklyn-based couple Jarrod Byrne Mayer and Melody Balczon. Secret Yoga Club, London This globe-trotting group promotes a mindfulness practice that continues off the mat and into the sonic realm. Following on the heels of a weekend-long Tuscan retreat, SYC’s next aural happening takes place in its hometown of London, where Susan Rozo will host a sound ceremony on October 5, incorporating both traditional percussive instruments (rain sticks, drums) and contemporary crystal bowls. Timed with the new moon, the session is geared toward renewal—and relaxation. Miraval, Tucson, Arizona Nestled in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains, this pioneering wellness resort offers no shortage of activities that bridge plein air fitness and tuned-in mental clarity. Here, in a literal twist on sound bathing, therapists play Himalayan singing bowls underwater while guests float in a warm pool, for a doubly relaxed, doubly charged experience. Dry-land versions are available, too. Wanderlust Hollywood, Los Angeles Serving as a permanent clubhouse for the far-flung yoga festivals of the same name, this Los Angeles studio lures in wellness devotees with flow classes featuring local DJs, as well as a rotating lineup of workshops on such topics as breath work, anatomy, and sound bathing. Keep an eye out for the aural Alchemy events led by Ambi Sitham, who often aligns her two-hour sessions with the lunar cycle, summoning untapped energies with gongs and quartz crystal bowls. Six Senses Laamu, Maldives Home to dreamlike over-water huts, this secluded resort in the Maldives takes an island-inflected approach to wellness, with fresh coconut-oil treatments and Balinese bodywork. Next month, visiting practitioner Khun Sommai and his Tibetan singing bowls begin a nine-week beachfront residency, which will also showcase his energy-clearing, vibration-based massage technique, Tok Sen. Woom Center, New York City As if living in Manhattan weren’t already sensory overload, this new studio on the Bowery aims to put vigorous yoga in literal concert with shifting sounds, visual projections, and subtly diffused scent. Once savasana arrives and the blindfolds come on, you might discern the gentle rustle of a rain stick or a tuning fork alighting on your body. For deeper immersion, there are weekly sound “journeys” that blend participants’ own vocal vibrations with a variety of instruments, including Himalayan singing bowls, bells, and chimes. Fresh Perception, London Best known for bringing mindfulness into the workplace, the London-based group heads to England’s verdant Lake District in November for an intimate retreat that combines meditation, yoga, and sound therapy. A Georgian-era farmhouse serves as home base for both lodging and daily sessions, after which you can chase the calm with a hike to nearby rocky beaches.  

    The post Why Sound Bathing Is Your New Shortcut to Zen—And Where to Try It This Month appeared first on Vogue.


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    Things are not always what they seem with the French photographer Sarah Moon. An elegant whisper of a woman in her mid-70s, she gives off a quiet intensity, seemingly mirrored in the strand of stark metallic beads fastened around her neck. “Flea market!” she explains with easygoing warmth. “They’re good, and they’re light!” Such juxtapositions—of fragility and strength, distance and approachability, the everyday and the sublime—are one of the beguiling characteristics of Moon’s photographs, which serve as enduring inspiration for so many in the fashion industry. After working as a model in the ’60s for the likes of Guy Bourdin and Irving Penn, Moon soon carved her own path behind the lens, creating a stream of iconic images, including Art Nouveau-inflected campaigns for the trailblazing London boutique Biba, light-dappled vignettes for Cacharel, and early Comme des Garçons work in full-force color. Next month, the photographer brings her otherworldly eye to a new project—and, even better, to packaging—with a limited-edition cosmetics collection for NARS, launching October 15. The collaboration with makeup artist François Nars (himself a photographer) was something of a meeting of the minds, even if the two were freshly acquainted. “It was like I’ve always known him,” Moon says of their shared perfectionism and openness to unconventional iterations of beauty. That plays out in the campaign’s casting: the doe-eyed Codie Young alongside Anna Cleveland, who has an “extraordinary face—a painter’s face,” remarks Moon. With unmarred porcelain skin acting as the canvas, the models wear translucent helmets and corsets, like superheroines dressed for an Ice Age remake of Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, with matte crimson lips, soft-focus smoky eyes, and oxblood nails providing the only hits of pigment. “Color, it’s really a communicative language,” explains Moon, referring to film, though she might as well have been addressing the expressive potential of eyeshadow. “I love black and white because it gives a distance to reality and allows a lot of different lighting. Color is light itself—it dictates.” Judging from this collection, that might be a loud statement (as in the Fearless Red Moon Matte lipstick) or a soft-spoken one, achieved with the blush-nude shade of Audacious lipstick, aptly named Sarah. While you won’t find the photographer with bold-colored lips (“I love it on others,” she is quick to add), Moon had plenty of experience with self-application during her modeling years: “Very often we had to do our own makeup—you had to go around with a big [cosmetics] trunk!” That hands-on experience proved to be a fitting entrée into a world of fashion and cosmetics campaigns, beginning with Barbara Hulanicki’s Biba. “It was really the thing,” Moon recalls of the boutique’s magnetic appeal. “We were going to London and getting Biba stuff!” The two women shared a love for silent-era screen stars, like Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo, and they played off those references by setting models’ pale complexions against moody backgrounds. Decades later, a similar notion of beauty—at once riveting and ephemeral—carries through to the NARS images. Moon often refers to her work as fiction, and she casts an eye for that narrative element on set. “When I work, ultimately, I don’t think—I react. What you’re looking for is something emotional. It’s what makes you kick,” she says of her take on the decisive moment. With cosmetics, though, real-world authenticity is just as important. “That’s what makeup is about: It has to be you, and yet it has to be daring,” she muses. Her new NARS pieces—including a three-piece touch-up kit called Non-Fiction, and a cheek and lip palette called Recurring Dare—will have you striking just the right balance between truth and fantasy.

    The post This Dreamy Collaboration Just Became Fall’s Most Photogenic Makeup Collection appeared first on Vogue.


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