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    Traveling in well-coiffed style is a challenge at this steamy time of year—a fact the fashion world knows well, having battled humidity and intermittent drizzle en route to the Alexander Wang party last night. That’s why our eyes perked up backstage at Victoria Beckham this morning when hairstylist Guido Palau coiled models’ hair into tightly pinned temporary buns, unspooling them moments before the show to “get some natural movement back in,” he explained. This buttoned-up chignon might be the perfect antidote to a bad-hair-day-making commute: It guards against mushrooming frizz while delivering easygoing waves upon arrival. If Beckham is perennially known for her head-to-toe polish (down to the crisp loafer mules at the Spring show), today’s iteration was a “very simple, very modern” take on a hair-down look, Palau said. After creating an off-center part with his fingers and blow-drying the lengths with Redken’s heat-protecting Satinwear lotion, he twisted the hair into knots and later raked a touch of flyaway-taming Diamond Oil Glow Dry through the resulting loose waves. The effect: uptown-cool hair that had a youthful quality “without looking unruly,” Palau explained. With a stretch of balmy weather still looming ahead before autumn settles in, now is as good a time as any to stock up on a fresh supply of pins.   Watch the Victoria Beckham Spring 2016 ready-to-wear fashion show:  

    The post Why the Backstage Hair Trick at Victoria Beckham Is the Ticket to a Humidity-Proof Morning Commute appeared first on Vogue.


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    The Fat Jew (aka Josh Ostrovsky)—social-media provocateur and soon-to-debut “dad fashion” designer—is popping up everywhere in New York City this week. So, too, is his trademark radio-antenna coif: a spindly, vertically oriented ponytail sectioned off by rubber bands (as if in search of a taller profile among the legs-for-days models). Such skyscraping hair is very much in the air, it turns out, as seen backstage this afternoon at Thom Browne—a designer known for decidedly more highbrow, hyper-aestheticized theatrics. There, hairstylist Jimmy Paul was transforming models into antigravity Pippi Longstockings, with long braided pigtails reaching up like Gothic spires, tied off with the label’s dainty red, white, and blue ribbons. “The set is a playground or schoolhouse upside-down on the ceiling,” Paul explained of the inspiration behind the dangling-from-the-monkey-bars illusion. To achieve the architectural effect, Paul relied on off-site prep work—and no small amount of floral wire. Using extensions in shades that matched models’ hair, he thoroughly teased each of the three sections and threaded in wire, weaving the strands into a “simple, simple schoolgirl braid with a dread-y look,” he said; each faux plait was then anchored to a small comb. Once on-site for the show, Paul slicked each model’s hair into super-high pigtails using generous mists of Bumble and Bumble’s Thickening Hairspray, slipped on the towering braids, and then wrapped their actual ponytails into loose clouds around each base. Of course, this being Thom Browne, the look didn’t end there. The already elaborate hair was capped off with a variety of open-topped hats—some diminutive, others wide-brimmed, still others veiled—which let the twin braids poke through like untamed weeds. What to expect when The Fat Jew presents his debut collection on Wednesday? The sky’s the limit.   Watch the Thom Browne Spring 2016 ready-to-wear fashion show:

    The post Antigravity Hair Is in the Air, From The Fat Jew to Thom Browne’s Spring Show appeared first on Vogue.


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    Oscar de la Renta—both the perennially polished late designer himself and the house now in the trusted hands of Peter Copping—brings one word chiefly to mind: glamour. And while last season’s beauty look (a fancy-dress French twist and cinematic cat-eye) captured that intrinsic elegance with a capital E, the backstage direction this afternoon at the newly restored Prince George Ballroom was fresh, romantic, and—most important to the fashion layperson—utterly reproducible. No step-by-step YouTube tutorials required. “It’s the idea of ease,” said hairstylist Guido Palau, who created a simple low ponytail accented with a black grosgrain bow for the occasion. “This is a hairstyle that everyone can do.” To achieve a certain “silkiness and smoothness” at the outset, he layered on two prep products—Redken’s Pillow Proof Blow Dry Express Primer (for heat protection), followed by Satinwear lotion (for a particularly sumptuous quality)—before blowing out the hair. Here, he noted, the small details matter: A shallow, slightly off-center part paired with a subtle lift at the crown lent a “more feminine” feel. Then he gathered the lengths (filled out with extensions as needed) at the nape, tied on the ribbon, and coaxed out a few face-framing wisps. “The indication of softness and this dropped-out bow give a little loucheness to the whole thing,” he said, adding that it’s something of an anytime look: “daytime, evening, summer, winter.” Diane Kendal’s makeup was similarly versatile, with two wearable lip colors divided among the cast of models. She drew on the crisp red mouth using a MAC pencil in Follow Your Heart, dusting it gently with powder; the nude lip was created with the forthcoming Velvetease pencil in Promise Me (available in early 2016). “By doing the lip matte and keeping the skin really fresh, [the models] still look really modern,” Kendal explained. Then—because, “really, Oscar lends itself to that kind of sophisticated glamour”—she painted on the thinnest coat of black cream liner at the lash line, “just giving a little kick out at each end.” From the stay-put mouth to the low-fuss ribbon, “it should just feel like she’s effortlessly beautiful—that’s the Oscar de la Renta girl,” summed up Palau. And, come Saturday night, you, too.   Watch the Oscar de la Renta Spring 2016 ready-to-wear fashion show:

    The post Oscar de la Renta’s Easy Glamour May Be the New Blueprint for Effortless Evening Beauty appeared first on Vogue.


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    If there’s one beauty product that encapsulates the Michael Kors aesthetic, it’s bronzer. “It’s just part of his way of seeing things,” explained makeup artist Dick Page backstage this morning at the Spring 2016 show, where he was burnishing models’ cheeks with a variation on the signature Kors glow. “Sometimes we go glossy and beachy; sometimes we go more desert-y,” Page said of today’s Southwest-inspired look, which called to mind “road trips that are made out of money.” (After all, Kors and luxury are virtually synonymous; in this case, the destination might well be Utah’s Amangiri spa, Page noted.) Fittingly for a girl on a desert drive, the makeup was glamorously pared down: matte skin; a bit of gloss around the eyes and on the lips; and Kors’s Sporty bronzer in Glow, swirled with loose powder “to diffuse it so it opens up,” said Page. The hint of warmth is undeniably flattering on early risers at this point of Fashion Week, he added: “Bronzer is a friend—a little color will pick things up.” The alabaster-skinned British model Erin O’Connor, who flew in for the show last night, agreed: “I came in gray, and I came out of the chair glowing and healthy, so who can complain about that when I’m combating jet lag?” Across the room, hairstylist Orlando Pita was kicking the look into overdrive, raking a model’s hair across her forehead for a windswept effect; in back, he twisted three-quarters of the lengths into a haphazard knot, securing it with an overscale amber hairpin. “She’s an outdoorsy girl; she’s in convertibles,” Pita explained, teasing out a few strands, “so they fly when she’s on the runway. It’s more like an accidental beauty.” Model Imaan Hammam knows that top-down, wind-in-the-air feeling well: This summer she and her boyfriend rented a Mustang convertible for an impromptu road trip from L.A. to Arizona. “My family is from the desert in Morocco, so it felt so good to be there; it felt like home,” said Hammam as a blow-dryer whipped through her curls. Near a town called Bisbee, the two met up with friends for a night hike to their campsite. “It was kind of scary, because there were snakes and cactuses everywhere,” she recalled, “but the stars were amazing.” Here’s to more Wild West adventures ahead.   Watch the Michael Kors Spring 2016 ready-to-wear fashion show:

    The post Why Michael Kors’s Convertible Hair and Sun-Kissed Skin is Made for an Epic Road Trip appeared first on Vogue.


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    An unmistakable glow radiates from the Brazilian model Caroline Trentini, whom we spotted backstage today at Michael Kors Collection. Sure, you might ascribe it to the desert-inspired bronzer dusted onto her cheeks by makeup artist Dick Page, or her corn-silk highlights courtesy of colorist Christopher-John, or the five days she and her husband recently spent on the secluded island of Fernando de Noronha. But that inside-and-out beauty speaks to a larger course she’s set for herself. “I was never the crazy, partying, smoking kind of girl,” she said, gesturing toward the bottle of Juice Press in her hand. “I’m glad it’s a trend, where people are getting healthy and working out and Snapchatting about it.”   As a mother of a 2-year-old son (“Look! He’s so cute,” she said, flashing a photo of a cherubic redhead on her iPhone), she puts a lot of thought into what she cooks at home—though she isn’t above the occasional indulgence. “I’m from the south of Brazil, so I eat meat. Once a week I like a good steak!” It’s fuel for the fire: After a period where she approached exercise like speed dating—“a little this, a little Pilates, a little that”—she has since become a fitness monogamist. “I try to work out three times a week with my trainer in Brazil, and we do a functional fight. It’s a mix between kickboxing and boxing—things that work for your body,” she explained of the intense, one-on-one sparring sessions. “After I had the baby, I fell in love with the workout. I don’t use weights; I don’t run. Just that.” There’s common sense wisdom in her thinking; after all, the best workout is the one that holds your interest, that you actually do. And as evidenced by her Kors look today—a floor-sweeping black shirtdress with peekaboo lace panels showing off her sculpted collarbones and thighs—the hard work is well worth it.  

    The post Model Caroline Trentini on the Full-Body Workout She Can’t Live Without appeared first on Vogue.


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    As soon as the bikini-clad Hadid sisters splashed down the beach-themed runway at Tommy Hilfiger, water instantly became one of the most Instagrammable accessories of the Spring 2016 collections. Starting tomorrow, expect to see more water popping up on newsfeeds, in the form of BKR’s adorably small (and similarly photogenic) new water bottle. The latest one—appropriately called Teeny, at 250 milliliters—plays kid sister to the company’s two larger versions, with the same narrow-necked, reusable glass body and colorful silicone sleeve. After getting requests for a handbag-friendly size, BKR’s San Francisco–based founders, Tal Winter and Kate Cutler, relished the chance to scale down. “We’re basically obsessed with tiny, cute things,” says Winter, citing their travels to Japan, where the two fell in love with the idea of miniatures. For those whose goal is lightening up an oversize tote while upping their daily water consumption (and the beauty benefits that come with it), the Teeny’s shrunken proportions certainly offer a unique solution. If there’s a certain mystique surrounding BKR bottles (addicted is a word customers routinely use, says Winter), it in large part springs from the evocative, on-point colors used for the silicone sleeves, which might take inspiration from the pale, sun-bleached palettes of Agnes Martin paintings or a dynamic shade of cerulean seen on the Prada runway. For the initial run of Teeny bottles, available October 7, there are eight colors, which include best-selling favorites (like the bubblegum pink Bambi) and newer shades (like Boss, a deep blue-purple that nods to the sort of confident woman who might rock a tux on the red carpet). Cutler and Winter see Teeny as replacing the ubiquitous 8-ounce plastic bottles handed out everywhere from airplanes to fitting rooms. “For people who love BKR, it really has changed the way they consume,” says Winter, who in a pinch pops into a restaurant to ask for a refill in lieu of buying a plastic bottle from a bodega. Plus, cutting down on bottled-water purchases might free up resources for more durable goods, like a new tote to tuck your Teeny into. Thom Browne’s winsomely cartoonish fish-shaped bag—a water sign if there ever was one—sounds like the perfect candidate.

    The post BKR’s New Teeny Water Bottle Proves That Great Things Come in Small Packages appeared first on Vogue.


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    The cool-girl, anything-goes approach to beauty is gloriously low-maintenance in every way but one: Keeping your nails in perfect condition is no easy feat. “The poor things are exposed!” says Ji Baek, the New York City–based founder of Rescue Beauty Lounge nail color, with a laugh. Riffling through your bag for house keys leads to chips; dousing on hand sanitizer to ward off that office-wide cold dulls shine. Same goes for pedicures, whether you’re digging your toes in the sand during a weekend in Miami or finding bliss (and smudged polish) in upward-facing dog pose. Factor in hard-to-pop seltzer cans, errant roller bags, and Net-a-Porter deliveries you impatiently rip into, and you might as well kiss your manicure-pedicure goodbye. Well, almost. Thanks to a new crop of breakthrough base coats and top coats, your nail color may be poised to stick around for a few more days or even weeks. From break-proof rubberized textures to UV-protective formulas, we’ve rounded up the best of them—along with a few key tips from the pros. Here, our guide to a truly indestructible polish job. Prep Before picking up a bottle of base coat, swipe a cotton pad dipped in alcohol or non-acetone polish remover over your nail bed to remove traces of hand lotion or natural oils. “If you have any residue on your nails, the polish will just peel off,” explains pro manicurist Jin Soon Choi. Baek has gone one step further, bottling her own formula known as Base Coat Prep. The quick-drying, leave-on polish provides an instant matte surface when swept across the nail, which helps the base coat adhere. “It’s dummy-proof,” she explains. Polish Sheer, neon bright, glitter-bombed: There are nail lacquers to match every mood—or It bag. The key is to allow ample drying time between coats, particularly for darker, pigment-rich shades. “I always do pinkie to pinkie,” says Baek of working her way from the edge of one hand to the other before starting all over again. “It takes about five to eight minutes, and that’s about the right time to do another coat.” For a true no-budge hold, Orly’s Bonder sports a rubberized texture that acts like double-stick tape for your color. Protect Not only does the perfect top coat steel your polish against everyday wear, it also delivers gloss in abundance. Dolce & Gabbana’s High Shine top lacquer boasts a near-reflective finish. Still other formulas, like Dior’s Gel Top Coat and Guerlain’s Le Top Coat Gel, strive to capture the vinyl-like effect of a long-wear gel manicure—minus the cumbersome application. Manicurist Deborah Lippmann’s Addicted to Speed Top Coat also does double duty, reducing water penetration to the nail plate while helping a manicure to dry on fast-forward. She suggests applying it every three days to refresh shine, while Baek offers a different tip aimed at longevity: “A day after your manicure, you want to generously bless your cuticles with a really great cream,” she says. “It means three weeks before you’ll need another pedicure.”

    The post The Best Base Coats and Top Coats: What Makes a Manicure Go the Extra Mile appeared first on Vogue.


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    On a recent Friday morning at the White Rose Collective Hair Studio, a new by-appointment-only salon in Manhattan’s East Village, Teddi Cranford was already in the swing of things. The French model Ophélie Guillermand had paid the hairstylist an early visit, the Danish beauty Kirstin Liljegren was in the midst of getting bombshell waves before a Victoria’s Secret casting, and an editor was perched on the sunlit window seat awaiting a bang trim. Between the speakers thrumming with a Future Islands–inspired channel on Pandora and a candle flickering on the Lucite bar (an eBay find “like Michelle Pfeiffer’s bar in Scarface,” notes Cranford), the space felt more like a friend’s living room than a whirring salon. Which, of course, is precisely the point. Cranford’s three-chair atelier quietly opened without signage during New York Fashion Week in September and acts as a home base for her boutique hair-and-makeup agency, also called White Rose Collective. The service, which launched a few years back and is now under Cranford’s sole direction, has earned a following among the cool-girl set (Pamela Love, Anna Ewers, Langley Fox, and Behati Prinsloo among them). Now, with the establishment of a brick-and-mortar studio—accented with a live-edge wood shelf and Pendleton hand towels, both nods to Cranford’s Oregon roots—clients can come in for bridal hair trials, red carpet styling for events like the Met Gala, and intimate, on-point cuts. (Diana Conte, a fellow industry veteran and White Rose stylist, also takes appointments; color is not currently available.) “There’s a different energy,” says Cranford of the one-on-one experience the salon offers, where direct dialogue and shared fashion references help guide the finished result. “Trust is huge.” Her approach to hair—words like personalized, effortless, and natural are a key part of Cranford’s vocabulary—is one she honed during her years at top New York salons (Bumble and Bumble, Sally Hershberger) and backstage alongside powerhouse hairstylist Guido Palau, with whom she worked for five years on such directional fashion shows as Dior, Valentino, and Dolce & Gabbana. The experience with Palau was “the best training I could have ever gotten,” says Cranford, who developed her technical skill and nuanced eye under his guidance. After a two-month stretch fueled by word-of-mouth recommendations alone, Cranford’s runway-to-real-life aesthetic at the salon is soon to be the talk of the neighborhood—and beyond. After all, the hand-painted gold sign on the window just went up. White Rose Collective Hair Studio 170 East Second Street, Store B; 646.477.9573;by appointment only Haircuts start at $150

    The post Introducing the New York Salon Where Models and Fashion Editors Head for an Under-the-Radar Cut appeared first on Vogue.


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    When Art Basel descends upon Miami Beach each December, an exuberant mood of excess tends to touch down with it. Along with the eye-popping artwork and tropical temperatures, a nonstop swirl of decadent parties gets under way in the city this week. For those hoping to balance out the vice quotient with a bit of virtue, we’ve rounded up the latest spa treatments, on-the-go manicures, cold-pressed tonics, and workout events to keep you primped, polished, fit—and hydrated—so you can soak up the culture (and the sunny social scene). The Sweat Circuit Workout gear might rival bathing suits as this year’s Basel off-duty uniform of choice. At 1 Hotel South Beach, guests can sign up for Hangover Yoga on the beach, boot-camp drills by Spartan instructors, and morning SoulCycle rides. The 40-bike pop-up (through December 4) features live DJ sets, as well as leggings by the Los Angeles artist Gregory Siff emblazoned with skulls and wheels; the on-site installation he’s creating will move into SoulCycle’s permanent location opening at the hotel this January. Over at The Hall, a pop-up by Montauk’s Surf Lodge pairs midday Equinox classes (Vinyasa yoga and boxing) with plant-based lunches by Sakara Life, which launched delivery in South Florida last month (through December 4; to book, email surflodgewellness@inhouseideas.com). For a more vibrant backdrop, YogArt hosts three outdoor sessions set amid the Wynwood Arts District’s Instagram-magnet murals (December 4–6). Or revelers can swap sun salutations for skates at the open-air Roller Disco, which revives an installation created last year in Buenos Aires by the artist duo Assume Vivid Astro Focus (through December 6, Faena Beach between 32nd and 36th Streets; skates provided). The Superfood Cocktail Cold-pressed juices take a turn behind the bar at The Freehand’s Broken Shaker, where the caipirinhas are laced with matcha tea or fresh-pressed kale and pineapple juice. At the art fair Untitled, the Brooklyn-based art studio Helper is manning the Tiki Bar on the terrace, where the specialty cocktail, Jooice—a zippy blend of carrot, ginger, and orange juice, available virgin or spiked—comes in limited-edition glassware by Rachel Harrison. Barflies can shop the artist-made objects for sale or peer through binoculars to take in Carlos Rigau’s oceanfront performance piece, The Dance of the Designer Refugee. The Lavish Unwind The just-opened Faena Hotel isn’t short on grandeur (Baz Luhrmann is involved), and neither is its South American–inspired spa. Tierra Santa Healing House officially opens December 21, but appointments are currently available for guests who can indulge in a suite of hydrotherapy offerings ranging from a jasmine-scented hammam and an ice parlor to a tepidarium furnished with heated stone beds. The floor-through spa weaves region-specific ingredients—Peruvian black clay, Palo Santo, maca—into its treatments; Biologique Recherche facials, by way of Paris, are also on offer. At the Carillon, the brand-new treatment menu (in partnership with Clarins) includes the much-needed Deep Sleep, which incorporates a dry-floatation spa bed to boost mood and blood flow, along with an exhaustion-fighting massage. The Polish Job Vanity Projects, the Manhattan-based nail-art studio with a Miami outpost, has long blended creative worlds with curated video art in its salons. This week, its artists—stationed poolside at the Thompson Miami Beach, or dispatched on-demand to hotel rooms or fair booths—are re-creating geometric designs inspired by Jen Stark’s kaleidoscopic work (as seen in the animations and sets for this year’s Miley Cyrus–fronted VMAs). For those who prefer uncomplicated luxuries, there are milk-and-honey manicures and pedicures—featuring a warm honey–sesame oil massage—at the Agua spas at both the Delano and the Mondrian hotels. The Head Trip Winter-weary travelers looking for a Miami makeover replete with bang trims, blowouts, and spray tans should head over to Atma Beauty, an airy 7,000-square-foot salon that opened last month in the city’s Sunset Harbor neighborhood under the creative direction of hairstylist and photographer Sheenon Olson. The Edition has also brought in its first resident stylist, Audra Straksys, formerly of WarrenTricomi. For guys seeking an intimate, old-school setting, Supply & Advise has unveiled its in-store barbershop with restored Prohibition-era chairs; complimentary cocktails are in the works. The Last-Minute Beauty Essentials Should your sunscreen get confiscated at the airport or your must-have texture spray go missing, not to worry: The chic Bal Harbour boutique Gee Beauty ensures same-day delivery to any number of local hotels and Airbnbs on orders placed by noon. (Founder Natalie Gee will also be mobile this week, offering on-the-go brow services.) Product junkies with less practical beauty concerns can swing by the Toiletpaper Lounge at Untitled to pick up its cheekily designed Soap (a fully serviceable, all-natural bar with a bite taken out of it), or browse the new carpets in the collection Seletti Wears Toiletpaper. One features a slew of hands, each proffering a tube of red lipstick; another presents a set of disembodied, perfectly manicured fingers—painted poolside, perhaps, as Miami Beach would have it.

    The post The Art Basel Miami Beach Beauty Directory: From Poolside Manicures to Roller Disco Fitness appeared first on Vogue.


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    In 1995, when the herbalist and aesthetician Barbara Close opened her Naturopathica apothecary in East Hampton, the world was not ready for the unusual tinctures and ointments that lined the shelves. “It was sort of nut-and-granola back then,” she explains of the crunchy connotations that accompanied the idea of healthy living. But the forward-thinking wellness studio attracted a fierce local following (including Martha Stewart and Heidi Klum) and, before long, Close had launched a line of natural-minded skincare rooted in her deep knowledge of plant-based medicine. Two decades later, as she sets up shop in Manhattan with a highly anticipated new Chelsea spa, holistic juice bar, and storefront, the world has finally caught up. Conceived as a place where energy-sapped urbanites can recharge with an array of nontoxic cure-alls, Close’s space takes a from-the-inside-out approach to wellness first. On one side of the store sits a Vitality Bar, where cold-pressed juices—sourced from Brooklyn and available on tap—come spiked with house-made tinctures, like the anxiety-quelling lemon balm found in the Mood Lift tonic. Kombucha, also on tap, and cow’s-milk yogurt from a biodynamic farm “gives us the ability to talk about gut health,” the founder stresses, not to mention the importance of stemming inflammation; The calm culminates down the rear hallway to the spa, where the six treatment rooms are blanketed in midnight black paint and accented with spherical light fixtures that glow like full moons. Treatments range from the toning Bio-Energy Lift facial, which employs gentle liquid microdermabrasion, to the Alpine Arnica massage, a deep-tissue unwind that is tailor-made for fitness diehards flocking in from nearby studios. There’s also an airy white retail area up front, subtly scented with cedar incense, featuring the full range of Naturopathica’s potent antiaging and restorative skincare (don’t miss the Beech Tree & Ginseng Daily Moisturizer or the Mighty Mint Rescue Cream, starring the “Swiss Army Knife of herbs”). Other shelves contain cobalt jars that hold loose-leaf teas that Close and her nephew, a tea sommelier, source from estates around the world. “They’re a great way to get the active benefits of an herb in a mild form as an ongoing daily dose,” she explains, pointing out a traditional fermented pu-erh tea that the Chinese developed for journeys along the Silk Road, as well as her Bengal Chai blend, spiked with the adaptogenic herb rhodiola. It’s an all-encompassing strategy that is meant to extend far beyond its downtown New York City neighborhood. “We want this to be a touchstone where people come back to learn new rituals and new recipes for health,” Close reveals of her goal to reacquaint all people—not just the wellness-obsessed—with the transformative benefits of self-care. Naturopathica Chelsea Healing Arts Center & Spa opens December 7 127 W. 26th Street, 646.979.3960

    The post The New Manhattan Spa With a Cure for Every Ailment appeared first on Vogue.


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    If there is an olfactory equivalent to Bing Crosby’s ubiquitous “White Christmas,” it’s the nostalgia-laced scent of freshly cut pine, a fragrance note played on repeat throughout department stores and family gatherings for the duration of December. Still, too much of a good thing can be, well, too much. Enter the new canon of alternative holiday fragrance, drawn from more pristine, less familiar regions of the forest: hinoki-like Japanese hiba wood, delicate birch, cedar, cypress, and palo santo. At a time of year when crowds are thick and stress runs high, a deep inhale of any of the lush, verdant aromas found in these 12 products can be transportive. And, best of all, they’re truly evergreen: One whiff provides a virtual escape into a quieter state of nature anytime you may need one.  

    The post 12 Alternative Woodsy Scents for the Holidays and Beyond appeared first on Vogue.


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    When the designers behind the five ready-to-wear labels participating in the latest CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund project find themselves thinking about color, texture, and transparency in the weeks ahead, they won’t be conceptualizing paper-thin pink voile or nubby charcoal-gray wool. They’ll be thinking about makeup. This is the first time the CVFF has collaborated with MAC Cosmetics, the beauty behemoth known for its sought-after, pro-level products and capsule collections (created in collaboration with everyone from Lady Gaga to Giambattista Valli). Beginning today, five womenswear designers (and former CVFF finalists)—Tome, Tanya Taylor, Cushnie et Ochs, Juan Carlos Obando, and Chromat—will develop a proposal for a six-piece makeup collection that captures the essence of their vision. Early next year, after a panel of judges weighs in, the winning concept will go into production (with a bonus $50,000 prize), and the collection will hit stores in 2017. Last week at the MAC Pro showroom in New York City’s Flatiron District, the designers showed up for a beauty school crash course. As part of the collaboration, senior MAC executives—including longtime creative director James Gager; Jennifer Balbier in product development; and Gordon Espinet, who oversees artist training—will serve as close mentors. Each team will be paired with a MAC makeup artist to experiment with the many formulas, finishes, and shade ranges they’ll have to choose from. They’ll also get a lesson in packaging design and marketing—“all the components that make a successful beauty line,” says CFDA president and CEO Steven Kolb, referring to the multi-pronged learning process. Prabal Gurung, a former CVFF finalist and one of the judges, is already intimately acquainted with what it takes to expand one’s purview from body to face: His gold-clad collection with MAC debuted last year to feverish enthusiasm on social media. He advises the current crop of designers to think expansively. “It’s an opportunity to tell your story through a different medium,” explains Gurung, who often weaves memories of his native Nepal and his elegant mother into his work. And unlike ready-to-wear, which is targeted to the luxury market, a collaboration with MAC has a much farther reach. “It’s such a gratifying feeling,” Gurung says of the way a makeup collection allows a designer to reach a new group of people. “What you put on your face is truly an exclamation mark to your whole outfit.” In honor of the MAC Cosmetics x CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Design Collaboration kick-off, here’s an introduction to its five contenders—and a cheat sheet to each designer’s own personal beauty inspirations.   Tome   Ramon Martin and Ryan Lobo, longtime friends since their fashion-school days in Australia, launched their label in 2010. Known for taking inspiration from a different female artist each season, they have fast become an under-the-radar source for elegant riffs on menswear and deconstructed staples. Earliest makeup memory: Lobo: Putting on my mother’s makeup at her dressing table—and being encouraged to [laughs]. I was obsessed with watching her get ready. I remember the smell of her lipstick, of her powders. Martin: It’s a similar thing for me—watching my parents getting ready for a party. It’s funny, my mother maintains that I didn’t inherit my ability to draw or design from her. But then I think back to that steady, steady hand applying the makeup, customizing her beauty, creating herself for the day or the evening. That’s artistry. Beauty icons: Lobo: Sade, full stop. Madonna. Grace Jones. They are emblems of striking, unique, natural beauty that used makeup and fashion to accentuate that. Martin: It’s always been film—all these moments where [female characters] are creating themselves. I’m thinking of Mommie Dearest or Blade Runner, where Daryl Hannah sprays her eyes with that amazing airbrush. And Butterfield 8: Writing “No Sale” on the mirror in her lipstick is one of the greatest makeup moments in history. Early collection ideas: Martin: [The MAC team was] just talking about matte lipstick being the best-seller at the moment, so immediately my mind becomes interested in translucent qualities and pearl. Lobo: Or, like, Jerry Hall in the high-shine red lipstick. If everyone wants matte, let’s do the opposite! Three words that describe your future MAC capsule collection: Martin: Beauty, softness, and power. Lobo: Universal, practical, and humorous.   Tanya Taylor   Since founding her namesake line three years ago, the Toronto native has drawn an influential group of fans, including Lena Dunham and Michelle Obama, thanks to her keen eye for painterly prints and saturated colors. Earliest makeup memory: Definitely my mom and grandmother. They always had a really bright lip. But when I watched Working Girl, with Melanie Griffith and Joan Cusack as a duo of friends, and saw how they played with makeup, that became my most vivid memory. Beauty icons: Bette Davis is someone we always have on a mood board in terms of eyes. Jean Shrimpton, in terms of details—my woman definitely likes focusing on one detail, like a healthy, clean, fresh face and then a pop-colored lip. Early collection ideas: I am a lipstick freak! I have probably seven lipsticks in my bag at all times, and I like to mix them. MAC’s cream lip stain is also interesting to me, and the packaging is incredible. Three words that describe your future MAC capsule collection: Artistic, bold, and fresh.     Cushnie et Ochs   A sense of fearless femininity—from body-contouring dresses to fresh iterations of the power suit—drives the fast-growing fashion label started by Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs in 2008. Earliest makeup memory: Cushnie: My mother is never seen without lipstick on! Even if she’s at the beach, she’s in lipstick. Ochs: It was lipstick as well [with] my mother. That was the one thing she would let me get into and experiment with. Beauty icons: Cushnie: In terms of her overall aesthetic as well as makeup, we’ve always looked to Michelle Pfeiffer in Scarface. Just how sultry she is. Ochs: Unapologetic. Owning the room. Early collection ideas: Cushnie: [Our woman is] very much an on-the-go global person—traveling, working. We really want to encompass what she needs, whether it’s for day or night, in this capsule collection. Ochs: We love a good eyebrow, good cheekbone—and bold colors for lipsticks. Three words that describe your MAC capsule collection: Cushnie: Sultry, sleek, and striking. Ochs: Or you could say, Cushnie et Ochs!     Juan Carlos Obando   For his eponymous label, established in 2007, the Colombian designer draws on his warm-weather roots, creating sensuous, color-drenched clothes that are equally at home in the tropics and on the red carpet.   Earliest makeup memory: I was born in Barranquilla, which is on the coast of Colombia. We have this immense carnival, and it was always this explosion of color. Very early on I [learned]: You need to dance, you need the music, you need the makeup! It’s that element that allows the character to come through. Beauty icons: Bianca Jagger. I just love her because the whole concept of her life is beauty—not just in the sense of beauty, but living life to its fullest. Early collection ideas: We’re always thinking about how to do that exotic, sultry, balmy, sun-kissed look all year long, so definitely bronzers! Nothing beats bronzed, gorgeous skin. It doesn’t really matter what your skin tone is. That look of the summer—it’s alive. It automatically puts you in an upbeat mood. Three words that describe your future MAC capsule collection: Hot, Latin, summer.     Chromat   Becca McCharen, who launched her fiercely architectural line in 2010, takes as many risks in form as she does in function, employing such materials as 3-D–printed panels and wearable technology. Earliest makeup memory: I was kind of a tomboy, but my mom did have watercolor eyeshadow. It was from the ’70s. I was taking lots of art classes, so I think I saw it as an extension of those classes. Like, Oh, I can paint and draw on my face! Beauty icons: My hero is Björk. I love how she is fearless and, from one album to the next, goes in completely different directions—always challenging what can be new. My makeup hero right now is any girl flexing on Instagram that’s not afraid to do a different color eyebrow every day of the week. Early collection ideas: I’m really getting into colors. I’m getting into shine and sparkle, kind of like a hot rod, like a car. The person who would be into our makeup collection is someone who’s interested in trying new things and sees makeup as an artistic palette. Three words that describe your MAC capsule collection: Bold, architectural, and empowering.

    The post Introducing the MAC Cosmetics x CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Design Collaboration appeared first on Vogue.


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    The champagne-fueled parties this week call for head-to-toe polish, from a Saint Laurent–inspired tiara (yes, you can) down to a high-shine pedicure—a requisite, according to the shoe designer Sophia Webster. As she explains by phone from London, her ideas about beauty etiquette were imparted by her grandmother Peggy. “She was always very glamorous and well turned-out, so she definitely wouldn’t have been seen without her toenails painted,” recalls Webster, herself a pro at the lightning-fast, at-home polish job. This season, when evening festivities call for attention-getting (if not entirely winter-appropriate) footwear, it’s all the more important to have your feet prepped and ready. Here, Webster talks about the perfect party shoes, her go-to polishes, the London nail spa she stops by for occasional pampering, and why glitter—in nail polish or in fashion—has timeless appeal. On the Perfect Party Shoe: “This time of year definitely warrants a glamorous statement heel—anything with a bit of festive sparkle, whether metallics, embellished details, or crystals,” says Webster, who is lacing up her strappy, rose-gold Delphine booties for her company holiday party. To ring in the New Year, she’s undecided between the Evangeline—“It’s got iridescent white angel wings on the back, so that would definitely be a conversation-starter”—and the black-satin Rosalind, with a crystal-encrusted beaded heel that has disco ball written all over it. Tips for Picking a Polish Shade: “I always work from the shoes when I’m getting ready,” she explains. “If I’m wearing black shoes, I’ll probably go for a deep red [polish]. I use a lot of Revlon nail varnish because they last for ages; they do a glittery red color called Gambling Heart. If I’m wearing metallic shoes, it’s nice to go with a nude. Wah London does a really good pearlized varnish called Oysters Delight.” In Praise of the Speedy Pedicure: A busy mother of a 14-month-old, Webster knows how to make every minute count—down to the on-the-fly paint job. “I’m good and I’m really fast!” she says. “Revlon does a quick-dry liquid that you put on wet nail varnish, and it instantly dries. I use that a lot. My husband’s waiting in the cab, and I’m like, ‘I need to do the nails!’” she adds with a laugh. “I don’t think there’s any excuse, really. If you were short on time, you could just paint the toes that you can see!” When to Get the Salon Treatment: “I don’t have much time for that, but sometimes I’ll go for a pedicure because you’ve got your phone in your hands and you can do your emails,” she says. “There’s a really good place called Cheeky, just down the road from the studio. You definitely feel a whole different sense of being pampered when you come out of there. I don’t think you can really achieve that when you’re on your own.” A bonus for the party-bound: “They can do your hair at the same time.” Why Glitter Is Forever: A nude pedicure might be in the cards this week for Webster, but the gel-manicure devotee has red glitter in mind for her hands. As to whether full-on sparkle has a target demographic, she sees it as an individual choice. “It’s totally timeless and ageless. I don’t think there’s a cutoff date when you can and can’t wear glitter,” she says. “My nan used to have a glitter suit that she would wear on Christmas Day. It was so cute! She would leave a trail of glitter, and then my mom would spend until the New Year Hoovering it up.”   Ruffles! The perfect solution to holiday dressing:  

    The post Shoe Designer Sophia Webster’s Guide to the Perfect Party-Shoe Pedicure appeared first on Vogue.


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    During the holidays, when cocktail parties get started soon after the office lights flick off, the quick change becomes something of an art form. Flats give way to heels, the overstuffed tote is downsized to a clutch—and then it’s time to examine what remains of the day’s makeup (precious little) and spin metaphorical straw into festive gold. Fortunately, with a little strategizing and an eye for chic understatement, the shift into evening glamour can be accomplished in as little time as it takes for the Uber to arrive. “The five-minute face is a blessing because it keeps you from overthinking your makeup,” says the Los Angeles–based makeup artist Rachel Goodwin. “Remember that it’s not necessarily about perfection; it’s about finding that little special adornment that you want to pull off”—be it a high-impact lip or a touch of glitter. There’s good reason we’re drawn to shimmer this time of year, she continues: “Not only are we feeling celebratory, but it’s also about craving reflective light and wanting to sparkle in the dark.” New York makeup artist Gucci Westman agrees that it’s an occasion for a fanciful nod to the season—a chance to “try something outside your comfort zone,” she encourages—balanced with fresh skin. Here, the pros offer tips for creating an easy, polished party face, with two variations: a bold lip with a subtle dusting of gold on the eyes, or pumped-up lashes. Either route will have you looking refreshed and ready before your ride pulls up.     Supercharge the Skin “Your skin does get pretty sad by the end of the day, with the heaters, the air-conditioning, the change in weather,” Westman warns. The first step towards pre-party revival, then, is hydration. She gently pats on moisturizer over existing makeup, followed by a mist of SK-II’s new Mid-Day Miracle Essence, which “perks you up!” she says. Goodwin’s secret weapon is Babor’s liquid collagen capsules, which come in tiny glass vials. “[The formula] is a water base, so it gives that plumpness and lushness without being heavy on the skin,” she says. “They’re miracles.” Clean Up and Cover Up To fix end-of-day mascara and liner that have gone rogue, dab a Q-Tip with foundation or concealer to lift any wayward marks. “That way, you don’t disturb the rest of the makeup, and you keep the liner where it’s working,” advises Goodwin. Then touch up elsewhere with concealer only as needed, says Westman (her pick: Clé de Peau’s cult formula), adding, “You want to look like you have beautiful skin, but you don’t want to see any of the labor.” Brighten Up the Cheeks To bring a little life back into your face, both makeup artists swear by cream blush. “The warmth of your fingers gives this really nice integration into the skin,” says Goodwin, who singles out Rituel de Fille’s coral-tone Delirium shade for special praise. “It’s immediate; it gives you that freshness right back—like you went home and maybe took a disco nap!” Or, in a pinch, pop a little lip color onto the cheeks, Westman suggests. “That’s what real girls do.” For subtle hits of shine (along the cheekbones, down the bridge of the nose, at the inner corners of the eyes), Westman reaches for Burberry’s creamy Fresh Glow highlighter. Or dab on RMS Beauty’s coconut oil–infused Living Luminizer, which lends a “radiant, glowing effect, especially in low light,” says Goodwin. Try a Bold Lip and Gold-Flecked Eye What else is a statement scarlet lip if not “the little black dress of makeup,” as Goodwin puts it? “It’s my French-girl approach to the whole thing,” says the devotee of Chanel’s “epic” color selection (Rouge Coco’s Gabrielle, for one; Rouge Allure’s Coromandel is another favorite). Longevity and precision are chief concerns, so Goodwin fills in the entire lip with pencil before slicking on lipstick and blotting. “When you’re wearing red, it’s important to get the shape perfect,” she cautions. “A full minute out of your five is going to be getting that cupid’s bow right!” To finish off the look, Westman pairs it with a hint of shimmery cream shadow in a warm metallic shade. “I’m so into gold and red. It’s so pretty, so chic,” she says. Or apply a thin coat of Urban Decay’s liquid glitter liner above the lashes and blend onto the eyelid with your finger for a super-sheer veil, says Goodwin. Her verdict: “Absolutely elegant, as long as it’s kept very minimalist. When you blink your eyes, you see little flecks of gold glitter.” Or, Skip the Lip and Focus on the Lashes Plan B: Bring all the attention to your eyes with a triple coat of mascara for a doll-like effect. Westman recently test-drove a peacock blue shade by Chanel, paired with little more than lip balm. “Think layers and layers and layers of mascara. Really pretty!” she says. Or stick with a classic shade that’s “black and inky and lush” in place of time-consuming false lashes, Goodwin suggests—after all, the party awaits.   Ruffles! The perfect solution to holiday dressing:

    The post The 5-Minute Party Face: How to Do a Quick-Change Makeup Job appeared first on Vogue.


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    It’s the time of year for a clean sweep—an occasion to weed through unwanted sweaters, undo the damage of wanton holiday feasting, and clear out bad juju. It’s also a chance to reconsider your beauty routine with a double eye toward efficiency and aesthetics. As certain Japanese-style decluttering devotees might ask, are there unnecessary steps that slow you down in the morning or unsightly packaging that, quite simply, doesn’t bring you joy? You might be due for a minimalist intervention. Think of this restrained, black-and-white collection of products as both a palate and palette cleanser—a beauty arsenal, perhaps, for the sort of person who color-codes their design books on Vitsoe shelving and stocks up on monochromatic Proenza Schouler and Margiela at The Line. Here is just about everything you need, from a gentle sea-salt lip scrub to slough away winter chap to a face oil that doubles as your complexion-brightening retinol to a classic piece of Chanel (every bathroom needs one). Streamlining your routine might just buy you a few extra minutes at the gym or in bed asleep (both worthwhile resolutions), and the visual calm might well be the (#Shelfie) morning meditation you need.  

    The post Does Your Beauty Routine Need Decluttering? 15 Shelfie-Ready Products for Your Inner Minimalist appeared first on Vogue.


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    When Amanda Chantal Bacon opened her tiny juice shop on Rose Avenue in Los Angeles four years ago, she didn’t think she’d be leaving the neighborhood anytime soon. “I had this amazing love shack in Venice that I bought the month I opened Moon Juice,” she recalls, explaining how she poured heart and soul into the ground-up renovation. “I couldn’t imagine going anywhere else.” At the time, she also couldn’t imagine the frenzy her business would stoke in the local wellness scene (and beyond—New York locations are next), and as Moon Juice expanded elsewhere in the city, Bacon cast an eye further afield, too. “I wanted something that was big and bright and open, with really clean lines—something that my little boy could turn into a very big boy in,” she says, referring to her energetic son, Rohan, now 4. With the help of a real estate friend, she soon found what she was looking for: an airy, cabin-like house nestled against a sloping hillside in Rustic Canyon, a quiet enclave in west Los Angeles. Built in the late 1950s with a pop-out Frank Gehry addition from 1983—with windows designed to frame the rise and fall of the moon—the 4,000-square-foot home was, to Bacon, as much an investment in contemporary architecture as it was an opportunity to finally realize her free-form approach to living. Formal dining room, no; steady stream of houseguests, yes. Several months after settling in, her eclectic strand of warm modernism is on view in just about every room. There are iconic pieces of design (a round Saarinen table, Alessandro Becchi’s Anfibio sofa); a collection of mid-century lighting; a tactile mix of sheepskins and Moroccan rugs; and the sort of accents you might expect of a rising wellness guru, like large-scale crystals and a prism hung in an upstairs window that refracts rainbows across the room. Many of the house’s existing features, such as the wide-plank hemlock floors downstairs and the wooden hot tub on the patio, filled with oxygenated, alkalized water, fit seamlessly into Bacon’s vision; other elements, namely the disco-era wet bar upstairs, have an expiration date. “This is being turned into a breakfast bar. It will be raw pink stone—no more smoky mirrors!” she says with a laugh, running her hand over the counter. But as with Moon Juice, she’s thoughtfully planning her next moves and enjoying the process. “There’s a white owl that lives in the tree that hoots at night, and there are incredible hikes right there,” Bacon says, gesturing through the kitchen’s glass doors that lead to an outdoor dining area. “It’s almost like a retreat center. That’s kind of how the house is unfolding.” A story on Amanda Chantal Bacon and the rise of Moon Juice appears in the January 2016 issue of Vogue.

    The post Inside Moon Juice Founder Amanda Chantal Bacon’s Light-Filled Home in Rustic Canyon appeared first on Vogue.


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    Right about now, back-to-work malaise (not to mention a long-delayed winter) is setting in, meaning it’s high time to start planning a tropical escape. If your idea of unwinding is a hard-paddling, exhilarating ride through the swells—and surf star Stephanie Gilmore’s video tutorial has you thirsting for the water—then this list is for you. We’ve polled the boardroom, so to speak—five avid surfers, including pros Quincy Davis and Kelia Moniz, swimwear designers Cynthia Rowley and Amanda Chinchelli, and model Andreea Diaconu—for their favorite winter surf destinations and the inside reasons why (spot-on mezcal margaritas, a tucked-away jungle resort). Enviable salt-streaked beach hair is just icing on the cake. Learn to surf with world champion Stephanie Gilmore:

    The post 5 Surf Babes on Where to Find the Best Waves This Winter appeared first on Vogue.


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    When Heather Tierney opened up her plant-centric juice bar and café the Butcher’s Daughter in New York’s Nolita neighborhood in 2012, she didn’t set out to sell the virtues of a meat-free diet. If anything, the smashed avocado toasts and market-driven salads were designed to be “hearty and delicious—almost like vegetarian food for nonvegetarians,” says Tierney, who counts herself among the latter. The concept soon caught on, and fashionable downtown types (and their carnivore boyfriends) flocked to the tiny corner restaurant. At the new outpost in Los Angeles, opening Tuesday, the laid-back wellness ethos is much the same—but there’s noticeably more elbow room. Located on Venice’s Abbot Kinney in a sprawling 3,200-square-foot space, the all-day café takes a something-for-everyone approach, with a takeout window for dog-walking locals, a 100-seat dining area centered around a large communal table, and a market stocked with a distinctly California-centric mix of beauty, fitness gear, and pantry staples. As for the biggest shifts in the menu, Tierney has the area’s abundant produce and a greatly expanded kitchen to thank. “We’re really lucky to be right by the Santa Monica farmers’ market, the largest one in Los Angeles,” she says, explaining how the concentrated flavors in some of the fruit have caused them to tweak the juice recipes. Seasonal jewels—baby carrots, purple cauliflower, and rainbow radishes—also brighten up the new Butcher’s Bowls, which ride the trend of combining grains, greens, and vegetables in one photogenic dish. Not that the food is strictly virtuous. A wood-burning oven churns out Naples-style pizzas with perfectly charred crusts and shaved-vegetable toppings. The in-house pastry chef, Ignazio Zorzoli, leads an ambitious baking program, with inventive twists like vegan brioche hamburger buns, whimsically named “tuffins” (toast-shaped English muffins), and a gluten-free caramelized banana bread “that’s just like crack,” Tierney raves. There are kale-spiked cocktails and private-label Butcher’s Daughter wines—a Pinot Noir and a Sauvignon Blanc, with a rosé to follow this spring—for those not on a New Year’s cleanse; the rest can order house-made juice and local kombucha on tap. Tierney’s take on healthy living also veers into green design and beauty (plans for an herb-based skincare line are in the works). The living plant wall on the back patio was installed with the help of Felix Navarro, who runs the Juicy Leaf down the street. Solé Bicycles, another neighbor, supplied the specially made yellow-striped bike in the market (“We don’t want to sell it!” confesses Tierney, though she will). Shoppers will also find handcrafted soaps by San Francisco’s the Greater Good, coffee mugs made in collaboration with local potter Daniel George, a custom natural-wood longboard shaped by Diplomat Surfboards’ David Sluys, and—to go with it—a bar of Kassia Palo Santo­–scented surf wax. It’s a reminder to Tierney, an avid paddleboarder who lives across from the beach, to get back out on the water. “It’s a great stress reliever,” she says. “Since I’ve moved to Los Angeles, it’s just a much bigger role in my life—paying attention to wellness.” The Butcher’s Daughter, 1205 Abbot Kinney Boulevard, Venice; thebutchersdaughter.com

    The post New York’s Favorite Healthy Café Makes the Move to L.A. appeared first on Vogue.


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    In Vogue’s February issue, Linda Rodin—former model, longtime stylist, and founder of the resolutely chic skincare line Olio Lusso—offers a first look at her latest launch: five pitch-perfect lipsticks. For her much-anticipated foray into color cosmetics, Rodin incorporated her signature blend of 11 oils, subtly redolent of jasmine and neroli, to create a “beautiful texture that’s creamy and matte,” she explained over a recent cup of tea, a perfect application of bright crimson slicked across her mouth. The formula also wears down to a long-lasting stain—the type of welcome bonus you might expect when a lipstick devotee calls the shots. Rodin hewed closely to her patchwork of personal influences when conceiving each shade in the collection. For Billie on the Bike, she re-created the ripe raspberry her glamorous mother, Beatrice (known as Billie), wore while pedaling through a 1950s home movie, while Red Hedy pays homage to the screen star and World War II–era inventor Hedy Lamarr (herself no stranger to a scarlet lip). A blazing vermilion is called Tough Tomato (“because I am one!”), and So Mod, a dusty nude, nods to ’60s sirens like Brigitte Bardot, Twiggy, Marisa Berenson, and Veruschka—Rodin muses all. Then there’s Winks, a Schiaparelli pink that throws a bone to her beloved poodle, Winky. Rodin also has an eye for spot-on packaging—in this case, transparent rectilinear cases that play off her love of vintage Lucite. Initially slated for February and now expected to launch later this spring, the lipsticks are available for preorder starting today—proof that good things really do come to those who wait.

    The post Introducing the 5 New Lipsticks That Are About to Take Over Your Makeup Bag appeared first on Vogue.


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    Today marks the start of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, during which the film industry digs its way through avalanches—of snow, of cinema—to find the unexpected gems we’ll all be talking about in the months to come. Among the hotly anticipated releases is Kiki, a documentary that explores the modern-day vogueing subculture in New York City’s LGBTQ community. It’s already getting buzz as the next Paris Is Burning, the legendary portrait of the 1980s drag ball scene, which sashayed off with the festival’s Grand Jury Prize 25 years ago. Madonna may have helped the strike-a-pose movement style rocket to international fame, but vogueing has its roots in those raucous Harlem ballrooms where Paris’s fiercely inventive performers faced off. Then as now, dancers organized themselves into tight-knit Houses, each led by a charismatic Mother, like Willi Ninja and Pepper LaBeija, who make star turns in the 1990 doc and in the GIFs below. Costumes were just as important, running the gamut from elaborate handmade confections to the trappings of the upper class (Wall Street suits, yachtsman whites). “Those balls are more or less like our fantasy of being a superstar, like the Oscars or whatever, or being on a runway as a model,” LaBeija explained in the film. With gender fluidity very much in the air and a chilly weekend ahead, there’s no better time to revisit the classic—and just maybe work on your power struts and shade-throwing moves.   Pepper LaBeija, dripping in gold and walking the walk.   When the dancing’s on fire, there’s only one way to keep cool.   Pepper LaBeija again, proving that fierce shoulder action outshines head-to-toe sequins.   Willi Ninja, working the crowd—and his quads.   When vogueing takes the form of a pose-by-pose duel (and makes a case for floor exercises in sweater weather).   Willi Ninja’s riff on applying makeup, designed to hold up a (compact) mirror to an adversary’s flaws.

    The post You Need These 6 Vogueing GIFs in Your Life appeared first on Vogue.


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